paradoxical embolism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

par·a·dox·i·cal em·bo·lism

1. obstruction of a systemic artery by an embolus originating in the venous system that passes through a septal defect, patent foramen ovale, or other shunt to the arterial system;
2. obstruction by a minute embolism that passes through the pulmonary capillaries from the venous to the arterial system.
Synonym(s): crossed embolism

paradoxical embolism

Embolism arising from the venous circulation that enters the arterial circulation by crossing from the right side of the heart to the left side through a patent foramen ovale or septal defect. It may occasionally cause stroke in a patient with a deep venous thrombosis.
See also: embolism
References in periodicals archive ?
Formerly regarded as an anatomic variant, often found at autopsy and of little or no consequence, PFO is now implicated in the etiology of cryptogenic stroke secondary to paradoxical embolism, platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome, neurologic decompression illness in scuba divers, and migraine headaches, especially when accompanied with aura.
This reversal of gradient is thought to be responsible for paradoxical embolism in some patients with PFO and normal intracardiac pressures.
16) In most patients, however, determining whether paradoxical embolism has occurred through a PFO requires the presence of the triad of elevated right atrial pressure, a venous source of thrombosis, and a PFO.
26,27) The question whether or not true migraine or migraine-like symptoms are due to transient ischemic attacks or paradoxical embolism is not yet resolved.
Paradoxical embolism via a PFO has been implicated as the most likely mechanism of stroke in cryptogenic stroke/TIA, and therefore, therapeutic measures for secondary prevention are intended to eliminate thrombus formation, paradoxical embolization, or both.
Presence of a postprocedural shunt was predictive of recurrent paradoxical embolism (relative risk 4.
The prevalence of deep venous thrombosis in patients with suspected paradoxical embolism.
Percutaneous transcatheter closure of patent foramen ovale in patients with paradoxical embolism.
The currently available active treatment options for PFO and paradoxical embolism include antiplatelet therapy, anticoagulation, and surgery.
As suggested by Nendaz et al, [12] surgery is less likely to be beneficial in older patients (age [greater than]50 years) because of the increased likelihood of a false-positive diagnosis of paradoxical embolism and the shorter duration of exposure to complications of life-long systemic anticoagulation.
In contrast, younger patients are at lower risk for anticoagulation complications, but they are exposed to these potential complications for a longer duration, are likely at lower risk during surgical closure of a PFO, and are more likely to have had a true paradoxical embolism as a cause of the cerebral ischemic event.
Persistent left SVC is relatively more prevalent compared with the left IVC and may result in paradoxical embolism due to accompanying lesions such as ASD, unroofed coronary sinus and its directly drainage into the left atrium (1).