paradigm

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paradigm

 [par´ah-dīm]
a shared understanding among scientists or scholars working in a discipline regarding the important problems, structures, values, and assumptions determining that discipline.

paradigm

[per′ədīm, -dim]
a pattern that may serve as a model or example.

paradigm

An example, hypothesis, model, or pattern; a widely accepted explanation for a group of biomedical or other phenomena that become accepted as data accumulate to corroborate aspects of the paradigm's explanation or theory, as occurred in the 'central dogma' of molecular biology. See Central dogma, Paradigm shift.

PARADIGM

Endocrinology A clinical trial–Pramlintide for Amylin Replacement Adjunct for Diabetes in Glycemic Management

paradigm

1. A human being's mental model of the world, which may or may not conform to that of others but is often stereotypical.
2. In the philosophy of science, a general conception of the nature of scientific operation within which a particular scientific activity is undertaken. Paradigms are, of their nature, persistent and hard to change. Major advances in science-such, for instance, as the realization of the concept of the quantum or the significance of evolution in medicine-involve painful paradigmic shifts which some people, notably the older scientists, find hard to make.

paradigm

term introduced ca 1960 by the science-historian Kuhn; a widely followed way of approaching an area of research, deriving from a notable early achievement in the field and carrying forward both its experimental methodology and its theoretical outlook.

paradigm (parˑ··dīmˈ),

n a generally accepted model for making sense of phenomena in a given discipline at a particular time. When one paradigm is replaced by another, it is called a paradigm shift.

paradigm (par″ədīm),

n a model or pattern. The set of values or concepts that represent an accepted way of doing things within an organization or community.
paradigm shift,
n an adjustment in thinking that comes about as the result of new discoveries, inventions, or real-world experiences.

paradigm

a pattern of thought, a similarity of conceptualization.
References in periodicals archive ?
That is, the text is broken into paradigmatic form; its linearity is repeatedly interrupted.
Developing a course around four paradigmatic questions, presented in this article, allows the exploration of strengthens and weaknesses for research designs in problem-based situations.
Examining the differing roles of the syntagmatic and paradigmatic axes of language, Jakobson (1971: 75) defines the relationship among syntagmatic units in terms of contiguity and that among paradigmatic units in terms of similarity.
The Syrophoenician woman, however, is not lauded by gospel authors, church fathers, or most contemporary theologians as a paradigmatic disciple.
That leads to paying attention to the way Abbasid apologists of the time portrayed the transition to the new dynasty as an Islamic revival, a return to Islamic aspirations of earlier times, using paradigmatic constructions of history to support the view.
These are all merely phases, some with defining moments--Duane Peters doing the loop, the Gonz ollie at Wallenberg, Natas and Gonz doing handrails, the 540, the 720, the 900--but hardly paradigmatic.
Its potential to offer an alternative paradigmatic basis for progressive social policy development in the future thus seems limited.
In the course of analysis of language material it was found out that a Renarrative paradigmatic meaning is a secondary affirmation of an action complicated by the meaning of Indirect evidence.
More than fifteen years ago, the authors (Grover & Glazier, 1986), proposed a taxonomy of theory intended to outline the relationships between multiple levels of phenomena, theory, and paradigmatic perspectives.
This new book constitutes the first sustained attempt to explore the possible implications of that situation for Israel -- a state long considered a paradigmatic `nation of arms'.
Moreover, it is a conception that can be developed into a full-orbed Christian interpretation of human faith and life, if the creativity that is God is brought into significant connection with the poignancy and power of the story and character of Jesus--regarded (by Christians) as what Colossians 1 called the "image of the invisible God," an image that is paradigmatic for the human sphere of life.
One researcher argues "that a paradigmatic shift must be undertaken that uses visually based strategies for reading analogous or equivalent to those for hearing individuals" (Grushkin, 1998, p.