paradigm

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paradigm

 [par´ah-dīm]
a shared understanding among scientists or scholars working in a discipline regarding the important problems, structures, values, and assumptions determining that discipline.

paradigm

[per′ədīm, -dim]
a pattern that may serve as a model or example.

paradigm

An example, hypothesis, model, or pattern; a widely accepted explanation for a group of biomedical or other phenomena that become accepted as data accumulate to corroborate aspects of the paradigm's explanation or theory, as occurred in the 'central dogma' of molecular biology. See Central dogma, Paradigm shift.

PARADIGM

Endocrinology A clinical trial–Pramlintide for Amylin Replacement Adjunct for Diabetes in Glycemic Management

paradigm

1. A human being's mental model of the world, which may or may not conform to that of others but is often stereotypical.
2. In the philosophy of science, a general conception of the nature of scientific operation within which a particular scientific activity is undertaken. Paradigms are, of their nature, persistent and hard to change. Major advances in science-such, for instance, as the realization of the concept of the quantum or the significance of evolution in medicine-involve painful paradigmic shifts which some people, notably the older scientists, find hard to make.

paradigm

term introduced ca 1960 by the science-historian Kuhn; a widely followed way of approaching an area of research, deriving from a notable early achievement in the field and carrying forward both its experimental methodology and its theoretical outlook.

paradigm (parˑ··dīmˈ),

n a generally accepted model for making sense of phenomena in a given discipline at a particular time. When one paradigm is replaced by another, it is called a paradigm shift.

paradigm (par″ədīm),

n a model or pattern. The set of values or concepts that represent an accepted way of doing things within an organization or community.
paradigm shift,
n an adjustment in thinking that comes about as the result of new discoveries, inventions, or real-world experiences.

paradigm

a pattern of thought, a similarity of conceptualization.
References in periodicals archive ?
We selected pilot test participants and assigned them to either the conventional or sustainable group based on the panel members' identification of their preferred paradigmatic traits and practices.
Some research studies that have used the productive Word Association Task have revealed that native speakers produce a larger proportion of paradigmatic responses when compared to the responses given by a group of advanced learners and a group of beginner learners (Wolter 2001).
Technology, we have proposed, increasingly imposes the paradigmatic, thus diminishing dialogue.
2) According to Table 4, this group rendered a balance response pattern: half paradigmatic responses and half syntagmatic responses.
Developing a course around four paradigmatic questions, presented in this article, allows the exploration of strengthens and weaknesses for research designs in problem-based situations.
Examining the differing roles of the syntagmatic and paradigmatic axes of language, Jakobson (1971: 75) defines the relationship among syntagmatic units in terms of contiguity and that among paradigmatic units in terms of similarity.
In Gournay's case her passion for alchemy seems paradigmatic of her will to dominate and test--in her life as well as in her literary inquiries--the supposed limits of nature itself.
Stukenbrock adroitly portrays the moment when the corpse arrived to be anatomized as almost paradigmatic (rather like an anatomical cockfight) where the many agencies and interest groups involved--magistrates, legal codes, university administrations, medical professors, eager students, poor relief agencies, clergymen, and, of course, the people who became anatomical raw materials--came together.
His actions set him apart; according to Ched Myers in Binding the Strong Man, the account "is well known as a paradigmatic story of discipleship.
Most important, it is to be a faithful believer in what is clearly a post-Christian age, for Christians are now the paradigmatic reactionaries.
Typically, the paradigmatic approach, as taken by the United Kingdom, Denmark, Sweden, the Netherlands and a majority of accession countries, introduces mandatory pension funding and slims down "pay-as-you-go" contributions in favour of voluntary saving.
That leads to paying attention to the way Abbasid apologists of the time portrayed the transition to the new dynasty as an Islamic revival, a return to Islamic aspirations of earlier times, using paradigmatic constructions of history to support the view.