panting


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panting

Etymology: Fr, panteler, to gasp
a ventilatory pattern characterized by rapid, shallow breathing commonly used during labor. Panting usually moves gas back and forth in the anatomical dead space at a high flow rate, which evaporates water and removes heat but produces little or no alveolar ventilation. It does not usually cause carbon dioxide levels to be affected. Compare hyperventilation.

panting

(pant'ing) [ME. panten]
Short, shallow, rapid respirations. Synonym: polypnea

panting

rapid shallow breathing; a mechanism in furry animals for losing heat. In humans, not a normal physiological pattern of breathing. See also hyperventilation, tachypnoea.

panting

rapid, shallow breathing, a characteristic heat-losing reaction in dogs; represents an increase in dead-space ventilation resulting in heat loss without necessarily increasing oxygen uptake or carbon dioxide loss.

panting disease
References in classic literature ?
But Pollyanna, Pollyanna," remonstrated Aunt Polly, following the little girl from the room and panting up-stairs after her.
from the rider, who now came panting up, and checked his horse beside them.
In books of great literature and love, one often reads about a person panting.
Yes, Katie Keane, who plays Mallory in Margit Ahlin's ``Climbing Everest'' does a lot of puffing and panting.
Harry Panting identified the body of his father, who had a nylon rope tied around his neck and his hands bound behind his back.
Amid all the panting, a dog at play makes a distinctive, breathy exhalation that can trigger playfulness in other dogs, says a Nevada researcher.
However, this exhalation bursts into a broader range of frequencies than does regular dog panting, Simonet discovered when she and her students analyzed recordings.
Although panting is typical for dogs in the summer, owners should be aware if their dogs are excessively panting or exhibit shortness of breath.