panoptic

(redirected from panopticon)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pan·op·tic

(pan-op'tik),
All-revealing, denoting the effect of multiple or differential staining.
[pan- + G. optikos, relating to vision]

panoptic

[panop′tik]
Etymology: Gk, pan, all, opsis, vision
pertaining to the enhanced visual effect produced by stains applied to microscopic specimens.

panoptic

(păn-ŏp′tĭk) [″ + optikos, vision]
Making every part visible.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
What could have provoked a scholar of Dorrit Cohn's often demonstrated subtlety to such a literalistic reading of Foucault's argument about the Panopticon (a reading quietly undercut in note 29)?
The digital panopticon of today's society is reinforced by laws regulating information transparency in the public sector.
Judith Bowers, of the Britannia Panopticon, said: "Stan Laurel made his debut here in 1906 and we are delighted John has included that special night in his book.
After he retired he published a book about his grandfather, In Search of Willie Patterson: a Scottish Soldier in the Age of Imperialism and his novel The Panopticon.
In 1786 on a visit to Krichev (in present day Belarus) to see his brother Samuel who advised Prince Potemkin, he seized on the idea of the panopticon and developed it as a form of contract management that he saw as particularly appropriate for the model form of the prison, both more economical and more effective.
This is particularly evident in Bentham's presentation of the Panopticon, a proposed institution of inspection built around solitary confinement and perpetual surveillance, which Bentham depicts as a model for prison life shorn of all cruelty.
This essay considers Jenni Fagan's The Panopticon (2012) as a contemporary Scottish gothic novel that unearths and depicts the systematic demonisation and dehumanisation of characters, such as vulnerable children in care.
Panopticon," in The Panopticon Writings, edited by Miran Bozovic [London: Verso], p.
The Panopticon concept occupies the field of surveillance studies for many years and it has represented one of the most powerful metaphors in modern "disciplinary" societies (Farinosi, 2011).
Arguably, the whole public space becomes a Kemalist Panopticon as far as the bureaucrats are concerned.
Liberation can come internally when a person goes against what the panopticon tries to stop them from doing.
And additionally, in a footnote: 'Ibagiya would have operated, in terms of its structure, location, and discourse, in a similar way to the panopticon described by Foucault (1979), (8) which "ideally", produced subjectivity, through the control of discourse and nondiscursive space.