palpitate

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palpitate

[pal′pitāt]
Etymology: L, palpitare, to flutter
to pulsate rapidly, as in the unusually fast beating of the heart under various conditions of stress and in certain heart problems.

pal·pi·tate

(pal'pi-tāt)
1. To beat with excessive rapidity; throb, as in the rapid beating of the heart during periods of stress or specified heart conditions.
2. To move with a slight tremulous motion; tremble, shake, or quiver.
[L. palpito, to pulsate]

palpitate

(păl′pĭ-tāt) [L. palpitatus, throbbing]
1. To cause to throb.
2. To throb or beat intensely or rapidly, usually said of the heart.
References in classic literature ?
She was a part of that involuntary, palpitating life, and could neither look out on it from her luxurious shelter as a mere spectator, nor hide her eyes in selfish complaining.
At such times she cocked both triggers of the gun, prepared to meet him with leaden death if he should burst loose, herself trembling and palpitating and dizzy from the tension and shock.
But what a different creature was this fierce-eyed demon, palpitating with life and vigor, glossy of coat, alert, growling, magnificent, from the dingy, moth-eaten replicas beneath their glass cases in the stuffy halls of our public museums.
He was closely followed by an inspector in uniform, and by the still palpitating Thaddeus Sholto.
No other poetry is crowded in the same way as his with pictures glorious and delicate in form, light, and color, or is more musically palpitating with the delight which they create.
You do not complain, but I see - and feel - and know that you are miserable - and must remain so as long as you keep those walls of impenetrable ice about your still warm and palpitating heart; and I am miserable, too.
Silently they waited and presently were rewarded by the sight of a mighty tusker carrying an amount of ivory in his long tusks that set their greedy hearts to palpitating.
Yet, palpitating and real, shimmering in the sun-flashed dust of ten thousand hoofs, she saw pass, from East to West, across a continent, the great hegira of the land-hungry Anglo-Saxon.
In her grey frock, palpitating with life, generous of form, olympian and simple, she was in deed the siren to fascinate that dark navigator, this ruthless lover of the five senses.
Girl number twenty stopped then, palpitating, and made him a curtsey.
That she went to the ripped-up window in the little room by the street door to connect her palpitating heart, through the glass, with living things beyond and outside the haunted house.
There the boy remained, with a palpitating heart, for half an hour.