palpable

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palpable

 [pal´pah-b'l]
perceptible by touch.

pal·pa·ble

(pal'pă-bĕl),
1. Perceptible to touch; capable of being palpated.
2. Evident; plain.
[see palpation]

palpable

(păl′pə-bəl)
n.
Perceptible to touch; capable of being palpated.

palpable

(păl′pə-bəl)
adj.
1.
a. Capable of being handled, touched, or felt; tangible: "Anger rushed out in a palpable wave through his arms and legs" (Herman Wouk).
b. Medicine Capable of being felt by palpating: a palpable tumor.
2. Easily perceived; obvious: "There was a palpable sense of expectation in the court" (Nelson DeMille).

pal′pa·bil′i·ty n.
pal′pa·bly adv.

palpable

[pal′pəbəl]
Etymology: L, palpare, to touch gently
perceivable by touch.

palpable

Physical exam adjective Referring to that which can be felt. Cf Nonpalpable.

pal·pa·ble

(pal'pă-bĕl)
1. Perceptible to touch; capable of being palpated.
2. Evident; plain.
See: palpation

palpable

Able to be felt.

pal·pa·ble

(pal'pă-bĕl)
1. Perceptible to touch.
2. Evident; plain.

palpable

perceptible by touch.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nearly all women who reported residual palpability described the treated area as softer and less prominent than pretreatment.
e, the vision enriched by subconsciousness of palpability by influent recollections of Touch) (N 2915)
While this desire, designated in all its palpability as "the thing," "still had the power to flare up," Irene decides that "it would die," it would have to be "banked and smothered.
In his famous essay "Linguistics and Poetics" Roman Jakobson argues that "[the poetic] function, by promoting the palpability of signs, deepens the fundamental dichotomy of signs and objects" (5) -- poetry, therefore, is enhanced semiotic materiality.
And certainly for passion he needed flesh and blood, warmth and palpability.
10) Having speculated about the manner in which the "subtlety" of glorified bodies would affect the way they occupied space, he further considered the palpability and agility of such bodies, and maintained that a glorified soul has the power to allow the transformed, glorified body either to be seen or not to be seen by non-glorified eyes.
Now in Canada's major urban center we are hearing voices continuing to express the palpability of the "the Caribbean of the North," inspired no doubt by the critical mass of a Caribbean-born immigrant population seeking to validate their diverse heritage and black experiences-for instance, in festival extravaganzas like Caribana, which a writer like Cecil Foster strongly locates in his writings as the new sensibility gains momentum (reflected, for instance, in his 1996 book A Place Called Heaven).
The "razor sharp details" give the otherwise elliptical situation a staggering palpability, and the reader is forced to balance the haziness of a hallucination with the hard particularities of a lived experience.
Complications such as capsular contracture, implant malposition or displacement, and implant palpability are not uncommon.
In the movie, the palpability of Ideology is materialized in different ideologies and the main character, on the threshold between two alternatives, opts for the totalitarian one.
Forecast: Snow" was landscape without land, woods without roots, and snowfall without cold, yet a curious palpability persisted, the residue of scrupulous conviction and attentiveness.
Instruments took on a palpability that was just not present before.