palliative


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Related to palliative: palliative treatment, Palliative medicine

palliative

 [pal´e-ah-tiv]
1. giving relief but not curing.
2. a drug with this effect.

pal·li·a·tive

(pal'ē-ă-tiv),
Reducing the severity of; denoting the alleviation of symptoms without curing the underlying disease.

palliative

/pal·li·a·tive/ (pal´e-a″tiv) affording relief; also, a drug that so acts.

palliative

(păl′ē-ā′tĭv, -ē-ə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Tending or serving to palliate.
2. Alleviating the symptoms of a disease or disorder, especially one that is terminal, when a cure is not available.
n.
One that palliates, especially a palliative drug or medicine.

pal′li·a′tive·ly adv.

palliative

adjective Referring to treatment to relieve or ameliorate the symptoms of a painful condition, usually understood to mean of terminal cancer, especially the deep-seated bone pain of metastatic breast cancer.

Pronunciation:
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PAY lee uh tive.
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PAL ee uh tive.

palliative

Radiation oncology adjective Referring to treatment to relieve Sx of a disease but not to cure it, especially alleviating pain

pal·li·a·tive

(pal'ē-ă-tiv)
Reducing the severity of; denoting the alleviation of symptoms without curing the underlying disease.

Palliative

Referring to any type of treatment that is given to relieve the symptoms of a disease rather than to cure it.

palliation

; palliative therapies that reduce symptom severity, but do not cure

pal·li·a·tive

(pal'ē-ă-tiv)
Reducing the severity of pain or discomfort.

palliative (pal´ēətiv),

n an alleviating measure.

palliative

affording relief; also, a drug that so acts.
References in periodicals archive ?
The organization hopes that its new extensive web resource will help debunk common myths regarding palliative care and increase access nationally.
The gift we give in palliative care is having a good discussion about quality of life," says Dr.
Contrary to expectation, early palliative care that includes realistic discussions about prognosis does not "reduce patient hope," say Howie and Peppercorn.
It found that, across all causes of death, only 17% of people dying in 2012 had received specialist palliative care.
Palliative care should begin at the time of diagnosis of a serious or life-threatening illness.
The terminology section on page 5 of the CMA document is helpful in clearing up confusion about euthanasia, assisted suicide, palliative care and medical aid in dying.
New Zealand is facing significant shifts in demography and disease that will challenge the scale and scope of palliative care and end-of-life care services.
No guarantee of palliative care for "children with life-limiting or life-threatening illnesses and the adoption of the recent Order on Child Palliative Care" as requested by the UN Committee Resolution of the Rights of the Child 2011.
But once informed, a similar percentage believed it was "very important for patients with serious illness to have access to palliative care at all hospitals," and that such care was appropriate at any age and any stage of a serious illness.
Palliative care physicians like Meier focus on the relief of that suffering, and not just for the dying.
The recognition of palliative care as a medical specialty by the [Health Ministry's] Medical Specializations Committee will lead to the advancement of this much needed medical field in Lebanon," said Loubna Batlouni, an outreach coordinator from Balsam, one of the few non-governmental organizations that provide palliative care in the country.
Palliative Care is a relatively new subspeciality in which an interdisciplinary team works at the invitation of the patient's physicians to address symptoms such as pain, anxiety, and psychosocial pain, with the goal of relieving suffering and improving the quality of life of patients with a serious illness and their families.