palingenesis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

palingenesis

(păl′ĭn-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. palingene·ses (-sēz′)
1. The doctrine of transmigration of souls; metempsychosis.
2. The supposed repetition by an organism during its embryonic development of the stages in the evolution of its species, as asserted by the discredited biogenetic law.

pal′in·ge·net′ic (-jə-nĕt′ĭk) adj.
pal′in·ge·net′i·cal·ly adv.

palingenesis

[pal′injen′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, palin + genesis, origin
1 the regeneration of a lost part.
2 the hereditary transmission of ancestral structural characteristics, especially abnormalities, in successive generations. Also called paleogenesis. Compare cenogenesis. palingenetic, palingenic, adj.

palingenesis

(păl″ĭn-jĕn′ĕ-sĭs) [″ + genesis, generation, birth]
1. Regeneration or restoration of an organism or part of one.
2. Atavism.

palingenesis

see HAEKELS LAW OF RECAPITULATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
In reading Paris alongside Ballanche's 1829 Palingenesie sociale, one observes that Hugo had not totally abandoned the principles of Ballanchian palingenesis.
114) The expression palingenesis was also occasionally used to denote Plato's doctrine.
that they basically endorse one form or another of palingenesis.
This volume also indicates the pragmatic efficacy of Roman Catholic and Reformed cooperation in social issues, it accurately displays Kuyper's philosophy of education (and founding of the Free University) against the Dutch relief, it explicates Kuyper's emphasis on the difference palingenesis makes for scientific theorizing, and it illustrates the affinity between Kuyper and fin de siecle American evangelicalism--a nexus that is frequently overlooked, minimized, or miscast.
98) For William Shuter's informative discussion of Preller and Pater, see "History as Palingenesis in Pater and Hegel," PMLA 86 (May 1971), pp.
I even continue to experience a strong intellectual embarrassment before "believers" (of any kind), and I continue to sustain the need for razors and truisms; and I remain, in any event, on the side of reasonableness versus any offer of palingenesis (but also versus any rationalism, be it understood), in the conviction - not at all playful - that a couple of calculus courses would do everyone good, above all poets.
Chapter 4 very helpfully expounds various conceptions of the end of the world: as successfully endured catastrophes, as cyclical palingenesis, as a one-time event, as annihilation and renewal, as destruction of the cosmos, as the decline of the West, as limits to growth, and as a nuclear holocaust.
In truth, Italians, and no doubt many of the international observers, had lost by 1997 any hope in the palingenesis promised by the birth of a Second Republic.
For example, Phaedon (1767) by Moses Mendelssohn (1729--1786), Aussichten in die Ewigkeit (1769--1773, 1778) by Johann Caspar Lavater (1741--1801), the final sections of Die Erziehung des Menschgeschlechts (1780) by Gottfried Ephraim Lessing, and Uber die Seelenwanderung by Johann Gottfried Herder (1744--1803), a reply to a pair of essays of the same title (1781--82) by Johann Georg Schlosser (1739--1799), the brother-in-law of Goethe, all contributed to a spate of speculative frenzy about palingenesis and metempsychosis in the late eighteenth century.
In the eighteenth century, the chemical philosophy flourished "beyond the establishment" in a host of minor works on transmutation, palingenesis, and other "miracles of nature," but within mainstream science and medicine the Paracelso-Helmontians were a decided minority.