pale

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PALE

Abbreviation for postantibiotic leukocyte enhancement.

pale,

adj in Chinese medicine, a facial coloration indicative of low energy, cold energy, energetic blockages, infections, and echo patterns. See also cold energy, echo pattern.

pale

lacking the pink color of normal viable tissue that is perfused with blood.

pale laurel
kalmiapolifolia var. microphylla.
pale willow weed
persicarialapathifolia.
References in classic literature ?
The pale faces have driven the red-skins from their hunting grounds, and now when they fight, a white man leads the way.
It was not alluded to in any way, and no pale young gentleman was to be discovered on the premises.
And in the westward sky, I saw a curved pale line like a vast new moon.
The pale light of the first rays of day gave to her clear eyes a strangely frightful expression.
Father," said Mercedes, stopping when she had reached the centre of the table, "sit, I pray you, on my right hand; on my left I will place him who has ever been as a brother to me," pointing with a soft and gentle smile to Fernand; but her words and look seemed to inflict the direst torture on him, for his lips became ghastly pale, and even beneath the dark hue of his complexion the blood might be seen retreating as though some sudden pang drove it back to the heart.
The pale face of the monk became so livid and his smile so strange, that Raoul, whose eyes were still fixed upon him, felt as if this smile had struck to his heart like an insult.
We can see the sweet pale face quite well now: it is scarcely at all altered--only a little fuller, to correspond to her more matronly figure, which still seems light and active enough in the plain black dress.
But if any shifting motion caused her to turn pale there was the mark again, a crimson stain upon the snow, in what Aylmer sometimes deemed an almost fearful distinctness.
TWAS noontide of summer, And midtime of night, And stars, in their orbits, Shone pale, through the light Of the brighter, cold moon.
Then he shrank for fear, turned pale, and trembled.
He had always admired the high and mighty old lady, who, in spite of having been only Catherine Spicer of Staten Island, with a father mysteriously discredited, and neither money nor position enough to make people forget it, had allied herself with the head of the wealthy Mingott line, married two of her daughters to "foreigners" (an Italian marquis and an English banker), and put the crowning touch to her audacities by building a large house of pale cream-coloured stone (when brown sandstone seemed as much the only wear as a frock-coat in the afternoon) in an inaccessible wilderness near the Central Park.
Philip, observing that he wore a pale blue tie, had on that account taken a sudden dislike to him.