palatopharyngeus

pal·a·to·pha·ryn·ge·us (mus·cle)

[TA]
origin, soft palate; forms the posterior pillar of the fauces or tonsillar fossa; insertion, posterior border of thyroid cartilage and aponeurosis of pharynx as it becomes part of the inner longitudinal muscle layer of the pharynx; action, narrows fauces, depresses soft palate, elevates pharynx and larynx; nerve supply, pharyngeal plexus (cranial root of accessory nerve).

palatopharyngeus

[-ferin′jē·əs]
a muscle with an origin at the back of the soft palate and an insertion on the posterior border of the thyroid cartilage and the wall of the pharynx. It acts to raise the pharynx.

palatopharyngeus

(păl″ăt-ō-fă″rĭn′jē-ŭs) [″ + Gr. pharynx, throat]
The muscle arising from thyroid cartilage and pharyngeal wall, extending upward in posterior pillar, and inserting into aponeurosis of soft palate. It constricts the pharyngeal isthmus, raises the larynx, and depresses the soft palate.
References in periodicals archive ?
The anterior tonsillar pillar is the mucosa-covered palatoglossus muscle, and the posterior tonsillar pillar is the mucosa-covered palatopharyngeus muscle.
These modifications include complete removal of the uvula and distal soft palate, removal of part of the palatopharyngeus muscle and the use of an uvulopalatal flap (13-20).
There is also differential activity of the palatoglossus, palatopharyngeus, musculus uvulae, and superior pharyngeal constrictor muscles.
In some cases, an increase in the thickness of the lateral pharyngeal wall is commensurate with the increase in muscle mass in the hyoglossus, styloglossus, palatoglossus, palatopharyngeus, and pharyngeal constrictor muscles; these increases are linked to the need for excessive effort to overcome the increased muscle laxity in snoring or during apnea.
Mortimore et al wrote that upper airway obstruction at the retropalatal level is related to the imbalance between the activity of the levator and tensor veli palatini muscles, which elevate and tense the soft palate, and the activity of the palatoglossus and palatopharyngeus muscles, which depress the soft palate anteroinferiorly.
Hemostats are used to clamp the palatopharyngeus muscle longitudinally on either side for hemostasis.