paint

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paint

(pānt),
A solution or suspension of one or more medicaments applied to the skin with a brush or large applicator; generally used to treat widespread eruptions.

paint

(pānt)
1. a liquid designed for application to a surface, as of the body or a tooth.
2. to apply a liquid to a specific area as a remedial or protective measure.

paint

Etymology: Fr, peindre
1 v, to apply a medicated solution to the skin, usually over a wide area.
2 n, a medicated solution that is applied in this way. Kinds of paint include antiseptics, germicides,and sporicides.

paint

1. commercial paint products are used in animal accommodation. Most contain some lead, even so-called lead-free paints. Therefore they are capable of causing lead poisoning in animals.
2. see pinto.
References in periodicals archive ?
Global Markets and Advanced Technologies for Paints and Coatings
Prior Information Notice: Stock market building products and paints and paint supplies
Then I'll offer information about "regular" paints and why they can be so poisonous.
Rather than not-painting or overpainting, Martin paints by painting-over, sometimes spending years on single works (two of his most recent are dated 1983-2005 and 1973-2005).
Outline your design: Use a very thin brush with face paints.
However, with conventional paints, discrepancies in paint film thickness can result between the inside and outside body surfaces because it is difficult for electrical currents to reach all interior parts and form an even paint film on interior surfaces.
It's a very exciting finding," says Jennifer Mass, who heads the conservation-science lab at Winterthur Museum in Delaware, adding that the optical properties of glass might explain the clarity and translucency of Venetian paints, which capture and reflect light in distinctive ways.
The castings undergo normal processing to shipping, then the paint shop picks up the castings, paints them and delivers them back to the foundry.
Periods of high humidity are bad for water-based paints, which can dry slowly and produce mold.
In some communities, there are special recycling programs for paints.
Until now, use of PCC's PET cans has been mostly for precolored paints and wood stains in Europe (see PT, Aug '01, p.