paint

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paint

(pānt),
A solution or suspension of one or more medicaments applied to the skin with a brush or large applicator; generally used to treat widespread eruptions.

paint

(pānt)
1. a liquid designed for application to a surface, as of the body or a tooth.
2. to apply a liquid to a specific area as a remedial or protective measure.

paint

Etymology: Fr, peindre
1 v, to apply a medicated solution to the skin, usually over a wide area.
2 n, a medicated solution that is applied in this way. Kinds of paint include antiseptics, germicides,and sporicides.

paint

1. commercial paint products are used in animal accommodation. Most contain some lead, even so-called lead-free paints. Therefore they are capable of causing lead poisoning in animals.
2. see pinto.
References in classic literature ?
The painter turned to his servant, who stood blinking in the sunlight.
From the corner of the divan of Persian saddle-bags on which he was lying, smoking, as was his custom, innumerable cigarettes, Lord Henry Wotton could just catch the gleam of the honey-sweet and honey-coloured blossoms of a laburnum, whose tremulous branches seemed hardly able to bear the burden of a beauty so flamelike as theirs; and now and then the fantastic shadows of birds in flight flitted across the long tussore-silk curtains that were stretched in front of the huge window, producing a kind of momentary Japanese effect, and making him think of those pallid, jade-faced painters of Tokyo who, through the medium of an art that is necessarily immobile, seek to convey the sense of swiftness and motion.
I bless and wed you," said the painter, with comic unction, laying his hands upon the heads of the lovers.
The modern painters who have survived the brunt of the battle, have lived to see pictures for which they once asked hundreds, selling for thousands, and the young generation making incomes by the brush in one year, which it would have cost the old heroes of the easel ten to accumulate.
The painter was therefore set to work; and as he wrought with assiduity and expedition, in less than four days the whole was completed.
And yet there is a sense in which the painter also creates a bed?
But would you call the painter a creator and maker?
For example: A painter will paint a cobbler, carpenter, or any other artist, though he knows nothing of their arts; and, if he is a good artist, he may deceive children or simple persons, when he shows them his picture of a carpenter from a distance, and they will fancy that they are looking at a real carpenter.
The poet is like a painter who, as we have already observed, will make a likeness of a cobbler though he understands nothing of cobbling; and his picture is good enough for those who know no more than he does, and judge only by colours and figures.
Of the painter we say that he will paint reins, and he will paint a bit?
But does the painter know the right form of the bit and reins?
And now we may fairly take him and place him by the side of the painter, for he is like him in two ways: first, inasmuch as his creations have an inferior degree of truth--in this, I say, he is like him; and he is also like him in being concerned with an inferior part of the soul; and therefore we shall be right in refusing to admit him into a well-ordered State, because he awakens and nourishes and strengthens the feelings and impairs the reason.