pacinian corpuscles


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Related to pacinian corpuscles: Meissner's Corpuscles, Ruffini corpuscles, Nociceptors

lam·el·lat·ed cor·pus·cles

small oval bodies in the skin of the fingers, in the mesentery, tendons, and elsewhere, formed of concentric layers of connective tissue with a soft core in which the axon of a nerve fiber runs, splitting up into a number of fibrils that terminate in bulbous enlargements; they are sensitive to pressure.

lam·el·lat·ed cor·pus·cles

(lam'ĕ-lāt'ĕd kōr'pŭs-ĕlz)
Small oval bodies in the skin of the fingers, in the mesentery, tendons, and elsewhere, formed of concentric layers of connective tissue with a soft core in which the axon of a nerve fiber runs, splitting up into a number of fibrils that terminate in bulbous enlargements; they are sensitive to pressure.
Synonym(s): corpuscula lamellosa [TA] , pacinian corpuscles.

Pacini,

Filippo, Italian anatomist, 1812-1883.
Pacini bodies
pacinian corpuscles - Synonym(s): Vater corpuscles
Vater-Pacini corpuscles - Synonym(s): Vater corpuscles

pacinian corpuscles

specialized nerve endings subserving vibrational awareness, located deep within dermis; formed as lamellated bulbs at termini of A-beta sensory nerve fibres (see Table 1)
Table 1: Afferent sensory impulses from the skin and superficial tissues
SensationSpecialized nerve endingSubserving nerve fibre
Light touchMeissner's corpusclesA-beta
VibrationPacinian corpusclesA-beta
Positional awarenessJoint proprioceptors
Golgi tendon organs
Muscle stretch receptors
A-beta
Sharp painFree nerve endings (high-threshold polymodal and thermo/mechanical nociceptors)A-delta
Dull pain/acheFree nerve endings (high-threshold polymodal nociceptors)C
TemperatureFree nerve endings (high-threshold thermal nociceptors)C
References in periodicals archive ?
Mechanoreceptors such as Meissner's corpuscles, Pacinian corpuscles, Merkel's disks, and Ruffini endings are responsible for the detection of tactile input.
Other sensory receptors include free nerve endings, pacinian corpuscles, ruffini corpuscles, taste buds, hearing receptors, and smell receptors (Figure 4-7).
The potential benefits of this approach "include preservation of the Pacinian corpuscles to optimize sensation and preservation of the palmar fasciocutaneous attachment," Beth Costa, an occupational therapist at the center, said at the annual meeting of the American Burn Association.
Traditionally, these receptors are classified as muscle spindles (Ia and II fibers), Golgi tendon organs (GTOs) and joint afferents (GTOs, Ruffini endings, Pacinian corpuscles, and free nerve endings).
However, some of the nerve endings, called Pacinian corpuscles, are relatively deep - about 2 millimetres - under the skin, raising questions about how they could detect such subtle vibrations.