pacemaker syndrome


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pace·mak·er syn·drome

the occurrence of symptoms relating to the loss of atrioventricular synchrony in ventricularly paced patients, or symptoms caused by inadequate timing of atrial and ventricular contractions in paced patients.

pacemaker syndrome

Cardiology A common–up to 20%–complication of pacemakers caused by adverse hemodynamic effects of ventricular pacing, due to AV asynchrony Clinical Vertigo, syncope, dyspnea, weakness, ↓ exercise tolerance, postural hypotension, palpable hepatic and jugular veins Etiology Alternating AV asynchrony in which the atrium contracts against closed valves, raising venous pressure or ventricle contracts before blood arrives, causing transient ↓ in cardiac output Management Dual chamber pacing pacemaker, antiarrhythmics

pace·mak·er syn·drome

(pās'mā-kĕr sin'drōm)
A complex of signs and symptoms that occur when atrioventricular synchrony is lost during pacing and relieved when atrioventricular synchrony is restored. Should be suspected if preimplantation symptoms recur in the presence of a properly functioning pacemaker. Symptoms may include vertigo, syncope, dyspnea, weakness, orthopnea, and postural hypotension.

pacemaker

1. an object or substance that controls the rate at which a certain phenomenon occurs; often used alone to indicate an artificial cardiac pacemaker; however, there are other natural and artificial pacemakers.
2. In biochemistry, a pacemaker is a substance whose rate of reaction sets the pace for a series of interrelated reactions.

asynchronous pacemaker
(1) an implanted cardiac pacemaker in which the induced ventricular rhythm is independent of the atrium; it is usually set at a fixed rate of ventricular stimulation.
pacemaker cells
(1) cells within the heart capable of spontaneous discharge.
gastric pacemaker
(1) a saddle-shaped area of the greater curvature of the stomach at the junction of its proximal and middle thirds, which regulates the frequency of gastric contractions.
phrenic pacemaker
(1) a device designed to facilitate respiration by converting radiofrequency signals into electrical impulses that stimulate the phrenic nerve, resulting in contraction and flattening of the diaphragm and improved inspiration of air.
pacemaker therapy
implantation of a pacemaker device in animals usually for the treatment of symptomatic bradyarrhythmias.
pacemaker syndrome
falling arterial pressure, low cardiac output and congestive heart failure, usually due to a suboptimal pacing mode.
uterine pacemaker
either of the two regulating centers that control uterine contractions.
wandering pacemaker
a condition in which the site of origin of the impulses controlling the heart rate shifts from the head of the sinoatrial node to a lower part of the node or to another part of the atrium.