pablum


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pab·lum

(pab'lŭm),
A precooked infant food, a mixture of wheat, oat, and corn meals, wheat embryo, alfalfa leaves, brewers' yeast, iron, and sodium chloride.
[L. pabulum, nourishment, fr. pasco, to nourish]

pab·lum

(pab'lŭm)
A precooked infant food, a mixture of wheat, oat, and corn meals, wheat embryo, alfalfa leaves, brewers' yeast, iron, and sodium chloride.
Synonym(s): pabulum.
[L. pabulum, nourishment, fr. pasco, to nourish]
References in periodicals archive ?
Harwood accuses The Story Of Civilization by Will Durant (and Ariel for the last five volumes) of being "scissors-and-paste high school pablum.
Maybe Americans are so tired of partisan bickering and name-calling that they would rather have pablum or a placebo than the nasty medicine that might actually work.
Readers are only provided with bland phrases that are pablum and that may or may not have anything meaningful to say about the state of the particular city, to say nothing of its relevance.
Maybe local governments will pick up the ball, but those will be community newsletters full of all of the hap-hap-happy news pablum government deems should be known.
After all, would special interests be peddling such dubious pablum if they felt confident about the economy's future?
It was perfect patriotic pablum for anxious readers across the home front.
Your contempt for the thinking of celebrities keeps you from really serving the pablum which is requisite, but the tendency in all your thought which is to go out very far, very wide, with nothing but your speed and your sincerity to protect you is something you probably hesitate before.
A pablum ad," Hardin said, "misses the point of branding.
Entertainment, as something you do on the weekends after slaving in the factory or the office all week, sitting at home at night taking in all the vile pablum spewed out of the television set.
One can't help but applaud Mallon's refusal to cede to the arbiters of good taste, not to mention his flouting of the workshop masters who insist that in novels politics must be reduced to an easily digestible pablum.
As Ellwood notes, Kerouac accuses "the average samsaric person of just wanting everything he's told to want by the high priests of consumerism, while he sits watching the same TV pablum and thinking the same thoughts as everyone else.