ozone hole


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Related to ozone hole: Ozone depletion

ozone hole

a seasonal depletion of the steady-state ozone concentration in the stratosphere, particularly over Antarctica.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such large ozone hole events may still occur in future years, as projections indicate that the recovery will take decades before they disappear entirely by 2055-2065.
as ozone hole gets wider appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
We think in about 2025 or thereabouts we'll be able to say with certainty that the ozone hole is getting smaller," he (http://www.
Natalya Kramarova, of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, tackled the 2012 ozone hole, the second-smallest hole since the mid 1980s.
There was a lot of Antarctic ozone depletion in 2013, but because of above average temperatures in the Antarctic lower stratosphere, the ozone hole was a bit below average compared to ozone holes observed since 1990," said Paul Newman, an atmospheric scientist and ozone expert at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.
The Ozone Hole website won a Montreal Protocol 20th Anniversary Public Awareness Award from The United Nations on September 16, 2007.
Although nearly every nation has now signed on to the Montreal Protocol, we continue to see a seasonal ozone hole because of CFCs' long life spans.
We were surprised to find that the closing of the ozone hole, which is expected to occur in the next 50 years or so, shows significant effects on the global climate," admits Lorenzo M.
Although Europe, Asia and north America have pumped most of the world's ozone-depleting chemicals into the atmosphere, it is in the south where the notorious ozone hole has appeared, bringing skin cancers to Australasia and other regions.
Nonetheless, the observed fall in CFC concentrations, a response to continuing global adherence to the 1987 Montreal Protocol on international CFC reduction, suggests that the ozone hole could close by about the middle of this century.
Scientists from NASA say the ozone hole over the South Pole continues to shrink and is now, in fact, two smaller holes that together measure 6 million square miles.
They have been studying the effect on subarctic plants of increased UV-B radiation caused by the ozone hole above the North Pole and have discovered that microbes living below ground are significantly affected, even though they are not exposed directly to sunlight.