ozone hole


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Related to ozone hole: Ozone depletion

ozone hole

a seasonal depletion of the steady-state ozone concentration in the stratosphere, particularly over Antarctica.
References in periodicals archive ?
We see very clearly that chlorine from CFCs is going down in the ozone hole, and that less ozone depletion is occurring because of it,' said lead author Susan Strahan, an atmospheric scientist from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Centre in Greenbelt, Maryland.
The smaller ozone hole in 2017 was strongly influenced by an unstable and warmer Antarctic vortex - the stratospheric low pressure system that rotates clockwise in the atmosphere above Antarctica.
But we may continue to see large Antarctic ozone holes until about 2025 because of weather conditions in the stratosphere and because ozone depleting chemicals linger in the atmosphere for several decades after they have been phased out.
We're still in the period where small changes in chlorine don't affect the area of the ozone hole, which is why it's too soon to say the ozone hole is recovering,' Strahan said.
There was a lot of Antarctic ozone depletion in 2013, but because of above average temperatures in the Antarctic lower stratosphere, the ozone hole was a bit below average compared to ozone holes observed since 1990," said Paul Newman, an atmospheric scientist and ozone expert at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.
The Ozone Hole website won a Montreal Protocol 20th Anniversary Public Awareness Award from The United Nations on September 16, 2007.
We were surprised to find that the closing of the ozone hole, which is expected to occur in the next 50 years or so, shows significant effects on the global climate," admits Lorenzo M.
21-30, 2006, the average area of the ozone hole was the largest ever observed, at 10.
It [the hole] has now risen to a level that has passed last year's, and is very close to, if not equal to, the ozone hole size of 2003, and also approaching the size of 2000," he said.
David Hofmann, who led a group from the University of Wyoming in the 1986 expedition and is now the director of NOAA's global monitoring division, told reporters: "We can say the patient isn't getting any sicker because the ozone hole isn't getting any deeper, any broader.
The four titles comprising this outstanding and strongly recommended series for school and community library Environmental Studies reference collections, includes Atmosphere in Danger (1932799125); The Ozone Hole (1932799095), Oil Spills (1932799109); and Vanishing Habitats And Species (1932799117).