oxygen extraction


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ox·y·gen ex·trac·tion

(ok'si-jĕn eks-trak'shŭn)
The amount of oxygen removed from the blood as it passes through capillaries (the difference between the oxygen content of arterial and venous blood).

oxygen extraction

The difference between the partial pressure of oxygen leaving a tissue and the partial pressure of oxygen entering the tissue.
See also: extraction
References in periodicals archive ?
Relieving the respiratory workload by positive pressure ventilation can make a major contribution to meeting oxygen demand, and thereby taking strain off of a taxed heart, reducing oxygen extraction and increasing mixed venous and arterial blood saturations.
The human body compensates for any decreased oxygen-carrying capacity in a variety of ways, including increased cardiac output and enhanced oxygen extraction at the capillary level (1).
The extract did not significantly affect heart rate and contractility, main parameters of the cardiac action that determine oxygen demands, while coronary flow increased up to 45% over control value with a simultaneous decrease of oxygen extraction by 34%.
Researchers examined the impacts upon heart contractility, electrophysiological function, coronary flow and oxygen extraction in isolated guinea pig hearts, and the direct vasodilatory activity of the extract on rat aortic rings.
Tissue oxygenation, defined as the relative saturation of OxyHb, depends on the balance between oxygen delivery, as reflected by the product of blood flow and arterial oxygen content, and oxygen extraction (Subudhi et al.
2,3) Studies have shown that improvements in walking tolerance with exercise training are associated with increases in the concentration of skeletal muscle oxidative enzymes (2,4,5) and improved oxygen extraction by the trained skeletal muscles.