oxygen cost

oxygen cost

the rate of oxygen usage for a particular task or work rate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ironically, the metabolic cost of snow shoveling (oxygen consumption for the whole body) may not be more than typical sub-maximal exercise like a light jog, but the oxygen cost to the heart is likely to be very high.
The headline finding has been that beet juice reduces the oxygen cost of exercise for a given workload," says Gilchrist.
The net effect is to reduce afterload and improve cardiac output with no oxygen cost.
This is consistent with previous research indicating that the MSWS-12 score is associated with the oxygen cost per unit distance in persons with MS [21].
They compared oxygen cost, heart rate, blood pressure, rate-pressure product, and rating of perceived exertion.
2] data, the optimum walking speed, that would elicit the lowest oxygen cost, was calculated and compared between the two shoe conditions.
It is unclear what the exact mechanism behind the apparent benefits is however the researchers suspect it could be a result of the nitrate turning into NO in the body reducing the oxygen cost of exercise.
Thus, the oxygen cost of breathing at rest is only about 2% of total body oxygen consumption.
Perhaps the oxygen cost of exercise was reduced, and indeed this mechanism was suggested in an early case report on the use of a high, wheeled walking frame [2].
Researchers believe the nitrate content in beets, which turns into nitric oxide, reduces the oxygen cost of low-intensity exercise while enhancing the stamina for high-intensity exercise.
There will be a particular RGO hip joint stiffness where the oxygen cost of walking will be at a minimum.
But, with the longer foot contact time, there is an increase in the oxygen cost of running at a particular speed.