oxidation


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Related to oxidation: oxidation number, oxidation state

oxidation

 [ok″sĭ-da´shun]
the act of oxidizing or state of being oxidized. Chemically it consists of the increase of positive charges on an atom or the loss of negative charges. Univalent oxidation indicates loss of one electron; divalent oxidation, the loss of two electrons. The opposite reaction to oxidation is reduction. adj., adj ox´idative.

ox·i·da·tion

(ok'si-dā'shŭn),
1. Combination with oxygen.
2. Increasing the valence of an atom or ion by the loss from it of hydrogen or of one or more electrons thus rendering it more electropositive, as when iron is changed from the ferrous (2+) to the ferric (3+) state.
3. In bacteriology, the aerobic dissimilation of substrates with the production of energy and water; in contrast to fermentation, the transfer of electrons in the oxidation process is accomplished through the respiratory chain, which uses oxygen as the final electron acceptor.

oxidation

/ox·i·da·tion/ (ok″sĭ-da´shun) the act of oxidizing or state of being oxidized.ox·idative

oxidation

[ok′sidā′shən]
Etymology: Gk, oxys, sharp, genein, to produce, L, atio, process
1 any process in which the oxygen content in a compound or the number of bonds to oxygen (or another electronegative element, such as a halogen) is increased.
2 any reaction in which the positive valence of a compound or a radical is increased because of a loss of electrons.
3 any process in which the hydrogen content in a compound or the number of bonds to hydrogen (or another element of low electronegativity, such as a metal) is decreased. oxidize, v., oxidative, n.

oxidation

The combination of a molecule with oxygen, which increases the atom’s valence with the loss of a hydrogen ion or one or more electrons. Oxidation reactions commonly involve the combination with oxygen free radicals, and result in major organ damage that accumulates with time; they are implicated in age-related damage, degenerative phenomena and cancer, and may be ameliorated with antioxidants, including vitamin C, vitamin E, glutathione and superoxide dismutase.

ox·i·da·tion

(ok'si-dā'shŭn)
1. Combination with oxygen; increasing the valence of an atom or ion by the loss from it of hydrogen or of one or more electrons.
2. bacteriology The aerobic dissimilation of substrates with the production of energy and water; the transfer of electrons is accomplished through the respiratory chain, which uses oxygen as the final electron acceptor.

oxidation

  1. the addition of oxygen to a substance to increase the proportion of oxygen in its molecule. Oxidation can be achieved without oxygen by the removal of hydrogen (dehydrogenation).
  2. any reaction involving loss of electrons from an atom. For example,

Oxidation

When a chemical element or compound loses an electron.
Mentioned in: Methemoglobinemia

oxidation

to combine with oxygen, or to lose hydrogen ions (electrons)

oxidation (kˈ·s·dāˑ·shn),

n 1. a chemical reaction in which oxygen reacts with another atom, molecule, or compound to produce a new substance.
2. a comprehensive term used to describe the loss of at least one electron from a molecule, ion, or atom.

ox·i·da·tion

(ok'si-dā'shŭn)
Combination with oxygen; increasing the valence of an atom or ion by the loss from it of hydrogen or of one or more electrons.

oxidation,

n the combination of oxygen with other elements to form oxides. The process in which an element gains electrons.
oxidation, beta,
n a metabolic process in which complex fatty acids are broken down into simple compounds.
oxidation, of metal,
n the formation of a surface oxide during the casting or soldering of a metal or during subsequent use by the patient.

oxidation

the act of oxidizing or state of being oxidized.
Chemically it consists in the increase of positive charges on an atom or the loss of negative charges. Univalent oxidation indicates loss of one electron; divalent oxidation, the loss of two electrons. The opposite reaction to oxidation is reduction.

alpha oxidation
important in the metabolism of fatty acids.
beta oxidation
major process for the oxidation of fatty acids in the body leading to the production of ATP. Occurs predominantly in the mitochondrial matrix, but can occur in peroxisomes. Oxidation of the fatty acid occurs at the beta-carbon, leading to the release of the preceding two carbon as acetyl CoA.
omega oxidation
oxidation beginning at the last carbon (omega carbon) of an acyl chain, usually a fatty acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
The scientists measured cook loss, textural properties and lipid oxidation (TBARS).
Oxidation was carried out with reference to the standard method ISO 6886:2006 "Animal and vegetable fats and oils--Determination of oxidative stability".
The Siemens scope of supply encompasses a Zimpro wet air oxidation system as well as a complete power management system for this project.
Duralox[R] Oxidation Management Systems are a unique combination of antioxidants designed to provide oxidative stability for specific processing conditions and applications.
Although the PV and AV are the most reliable chemical methods for rancidity measurements in these oils, the information on the quantitative relationship between PV and AV and the specific volatile oxidation products is lacking.
The application of certain hydroperoxides typical of triglycerides might reveal their impact on lubricating properties which is of great importance at the initial oxidation stages (Fox, Stachowiak 2007).
An inert gas atmosphere (nitrogen or argon) was once thought to be a good means of protecting stainless steel slab from oxidation at high temperatures.
The extract also inhibited the oxidation of meat pigments, preserving the fresh redness of treated meat when used at levels ranging from 0.
Oxidation destabilizes oil droplets in emulsified food, degrading and changing the chemical structure of the oil and causing it to go bad.
This oxidation happens in a wide range of products, shortening their shelf lives.
Proteins are well known to be sensitive to oxidative damage by a variety of oxidants, and it has been suggested that protein oxidation is as a causative or contributory factor in many diseases.
For example, how does the oxidation profile develop with time for polyethylene composites?