oxalic acid


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Related to oxalic acid: oxalic acid poisoning

oxalic acid

 [ok-sal´ik]
a poisonous dicarboxylic acid found in various fruits and vegetables, and formed in the metabolism of ascorbic acid and ethylene glycol. While it is not usually a problem with normal diets, it is seen in high concentrations in certain ornamental plants (such as Diffenbachia), as well as in some bleaches and antirust products. Persons or animals that chew on the plants or otherwise consume the chemical can be poisoned. Oxalic acid is highly toxic and if ingested vomiting should not be induced. If the person is at home, a poison control center and emergency services should be contacted immediately. The acid can be neutralized by administration of calcium by either the oral or the intravenous route. High urinary oxalate concentrations may cause deposition of kidney stones and other urinary calculi.

ox·al·ic ac·id

(ok-sal'ik as'id),
An acid found in many plants and vegetables, particularly in buckwheat (family Polygoniaceae) and Oxalis (family Oxalidaceae); used as a hemostatic in veterinary medicine, but toxic in elevated levels when ingested by humans; also used in the removal of ink and other stains, and as a general reducing agent; salts of oxalic acid are found in renal calculi; accumulates in cases of primary hyperoxaluria.

oxalic acid

/ox·al·ic ac·id/ (ok-sal´ik) a dicarboxylic acid occurring in various fruits and vegetables and as a metabolic product of glyoxylic or ascorbic acid; it is not metabolized but is excreted in the urine. Excess may lead to formation of calcium oxalate calculi in the kidney.

oxalic acid (H2C2O4)

[oksal′ik]
a member of a family of dibasic acids found in many common plants, such as buckwheat, wood sorrel, and rhubarb. It is an important reagent and is used in bleaching and drying. Poisonous if ingested, oxalic acid is used in veterinary medicine as a hemostatic. In dietary intake of foods containing oxalic acid, the substance binds with calcium and is sometimes found in renal calculi and the urine of patients with hyperoxaluria. Also called ethanedioic acid.

ox·al·ic ac·id

(ok-sal'ik as'id)
An acid found in many plants and vegetables; used as a hemostatic in veterinary medicine, but toxic when ingested by humans; also used in the removal of ink and other stains, and as a general reducing agent; salts of oxalic acid are found in renal calculi; accumulates in cases of primary hyperoxaluria.

ox·al·ic ac·id

(ok-sal'ik as'id)
Acid found in many plants and vegetables; toxic in elevated levels when ingested by humans; also used in the removal of ink and other stains, and as a general reducing agent.

oxalic acid

a poisonous, dibasic acid found in various fruits and vegetables, and formed in the metabolism of ascorbic acid. In plants the acid is present in the form of oxalate.
The commercial acid is highly toxic and if ingested should be neutralized by the administration of lime water (calcium hydroxide solution) or other convenient source of calcium, which reacts with the acid to form insoluble calcium oxalate.

oxalic acid test papers
used to detect indole production in an indole test.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the authorities are taking steps to root out the perpetrator and the motive, EcoWaste said the incident is a sad wake-up call for the government to take action and strictly regulate the use of oxalic acid and similar highly toxic household materials.
As can be seen, there is a clear differential distinction in the response of the MRC-5 in comparison to the A 549 cell line in that, all organics have killed the A549 and that the MRC-5 cell line was not affected except for the Oxalic acid (even after PH neutralization).
Table 1: Factors that Affect Oxalate Metabolism that Are Covered in the Urine Organic Acid Test Metabolites Significance Oxalic acid Extremely acidic organic acid that traps heavy metals and deposits in a variety of tissues throughout the body.
05-M LMW organic acid solutions can be ranked by their ability to remove zinc from the SS in the following order: oxalic acid (51%) > > citric acid (13%) [approximately equal to] acetic acid (12%).
Oxalic acid is generally known to be widely distributed across different GLVs [26].
CRS was soaked in 2 percent oxalic acid solution for 2 hours at room temperature with occasional shaking.
Simple method for determination of oxalic acid in forages using high-performance liquid chromatography.
Cleaners that contain oxalic acid will likely be effective for removing WSE.
Of the organic acid anions released from the root, citric acid (H-citrate) and oxalic acid (H-oxalate) are often released in the highest amounts and evidence suggests that they may be effective at solubilising metals in calcareous soils (Strom 1997).
Oxalic acid content means the green leaves are poisonous - although large amounts would have to be eaten before tell-tale symptoms of throat swelling occurred.
The most common type of kidney stone is calcium bound to oxalic acid.
0), oxalic acid, bovine serum albumin and 4-aminophenazone were purchased from Sigma Chemical Co.