life

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life

(līf),
1. Vitality, the essential condition of being alive; the state of existence characterized by such functions as metabolism, growth, reproduction, adaptation, and response to stimuli.
2. Living organisms such as animals and plants.
[A.S. lif]

life

(līf) the aggregate of vital phenomena; the quality or principle by which living things are distinguished from inorganic matter, as manifested by such phenomena as metabolism, growth, reproduction, adaptation, etc.

life

(līf)
n. pl. lives (līvz)
a. The property or quality that distinguishes living organisms from dead organisms and inanimate matter, manifested in functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, and response to stimuli or adaptation to the environment originating from within the organism.
b. The characteristic state or condition of a living organism.
adj.
Of or relating to animate existence; involved in or necessary for living: life processes.

life

Etymology: AS, lif
the energy that enables organisms to grow, reproduce, absorb and use nutrients, and evolve, and, in some organisms, to achieve mobility, express consciousness, and demonstrate a voluntary use of the senses.
Industry The duration of a product or material in its as-manufactured form
SciSpeak The duration of a substance in a system
Vox populi A constellation of vital phenomena—organization, irritability, movement, growth, reproduction, adaptation

life

1. A constellation of vital phenomena–organization, irritability, movement, growth, reproduction, adaptation. See Quality of life, Sex life, Sexual life.
2. The duration of a product or material in its as-manufactured form. See Shelf life.
3. The duration of a substance in a system. See Biological half-life.

LIFE

Cardiology A clinical trial–Losartan Intervention for Endpoint Reduction in Hypertension comparing the effects of 2 antihypertensives on cardiovascular M&M. See Antihypertensive, Atenolol, Hypertension, Losartan.

life

(līf)
1. The quality or condition proper to living beings; the state of existence characterized by such functions as metabolism, growth, reproduction, adaptation, and response to stimuli.
2. Living organisms such as animals and plants.
[A.S. lif]

life

A self-replicating chemical system capable of undergoing Darwinian evolution. This is but one of many proposed definitions of the term.

life

the continuation of the collective activities of an organism.

Patient discussion about life

Q. So now it’s for life? Just like that, out of the blue my doctor told me a few months ago that I apparently I have diabetes (although I’m already 37), and that I’ll need to inject insulin to control my blood sugar. Moreover, I’ll have to restrict my diet and plan everything I put inside my mouth ahead. So far I manage with it, but it interfere with my life so much I don’t how long I can keep this way- it’s like I lost the possibility to be spontaneous in my llife. How do you cope with it?

A. Hi,
I share similar feelings- I was also diagnosed with type 1 diabetes a couple of years ago at 35, and indeed I have to plan my meals ahead. I don’t have any magical solution, but I can at least tell you that’s once you (and your environment) make some helpful technical changes, it feels less of a problem.

But hey, at least we had our twenties to live freely :)

Q. Is it for life? I was recently diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, and started taking meds (MTX and others). How long will I have to take these medications?

A. sadly, i can't give you better news then mrfoot56 and brwnis65. these medication are for life. but there are all sort of new treatments that are now researched, using biological ways to reduce the immunoglobolins complexes that accumulates in your joints, here is an article about top 10 advances of 2007:
http://www.arthritis.org/media/newsroom/news-releases/Top_10_Arthritis_Advances_of_2007.pdf

Q. Give life to her please! Here is a really confusing question to you all. But your reply is a life for her. I know someone who is bipolar and she thinks that her ‘brother’ sexually molested her when they were kids. Can this be a delusion? Or hallucinating?

A. Im going to answer this question a little different;What if she is telling the truth,and her brother is planning on no body believing her? because she has this disease?---keep that in mind when you take her to the DR--mrfoot56

More discussions about life
References in classic literature ?
Disguised, and under an assumed name, he returned to Salt Lake City, careless what became of his own life, as long as he obtained what he knew to be justice.
We cannot say, indeed, that this history is carried on quite to the end of the life of this famous Moll Flanders, as she calls herself, for nobody can write their own life to the full end of it, unless they can write it after they are dead.
An artist should create beautiful things, but should put nothing of his own life into them.
Ere long a carriage will dash past here, drawn by the pair of dappled gray horses you saw me with yesterday; now, at the risk of your own life, you must manage to stop those horses before my door.
With this exclamation, the most frequent in his mouth, the unfortunate man clutched both hands upon his breast as if an intolerable sting or torture impelled him to rend it open and let out the living mischief, even should it be intertwined with his own life.
Then, general, it's your turn," continued Nastasia Philipovna, "and if you refuse, the whole game will fall through, which will disappoint me very much, for I was looking forward to relating a certain 'page of my own life.
Casaubon on his marriage left strong measures open to him, but in ruminating on them his mind inevitably dwelt so much on the probabilities of his own life that the longing to get the nearest possible calculation had at last overcome his proud reticence, and had determined him to ask Lydgate's opinion as to the nature of his illness.
And, though the sight of her was provocative of nausea and the contact of her provocative of despair, although he could not escape her awfulness in his dream-haunted nightmares of her, he nevertheless was aware of the cosmic verity of sex that animated her and that made her own life of less value than the happiness of her lover with whom she hoped to mate.
The comfort and luxury about her, the merriment of her child, who looked prettier still in the dainty garb that had replaced his baby-clothes, were pledges of a happy future for the little one, in whom she saw her own life renewed.
He said he would show by a chain of circumstantial evidence without break or fault in it anywhere, that the principal prisoner at the bar committed the murder; that the motive was partly revenge, and partly a desire to take his own life out of jeopardy, and that his brother, by his presence, was a consenting accessory to the crime; a crime which was the basest known to the calendar of human misdeeds--assassination; that it was conceived by the blackest of hearts and consummated by the cowardliest of hands; a crime which had broken a loving sister's heart, blighted the happiness of a young nephew who was as dear as a son, brought inconsolable grief to many friends, and sorrow and loss to the whole community.
At the steepest point of the hill there was a little burial-ground, with a Cross and a new large figure of Our Saviour on it; it was a poor figure in wood, done by some inexperienced rustic carver, but he had studied the figure from the life--his own life, maybe--for it was dreadfully spare and thin.
Certainly," I answered, taking the sabre in my hands, and making a sign to the princess to fear nothing, as it was my own life that I was about to sacrifice, and not hers.