overreact

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o·ver·re·act

(ō′vər-rē-ăkt′)
v.
To react with unnecessary or inappropriate force, emotional display, or violence.
References in periodicals archive ?
In predicting an overreactive discipline style, only the first step was statistically significant for well mothers, explaining 21% of the variance.
Similarly, Smith and O'Leary (1998) found that those parents who made child-centred/dispositional attributions for their child's behaviour showed significantly higher ratings of subjective anger and were more overreactive or harsh in their style of discipline and parenting.
There's evidence that these children will have an overreactive stress response that lasts into adulthood.
One student was described as seeing herself in an elevated position in the organizational hierarchy, and another "knew everything and was quite outspoken" and was overreactive to and personally wounded by team members' suggestions.
Lyrica works by attaching to the part of the overreactive nerve cells that trigger pain; this is thought to reduce too-frequent pain signals.
The histologic differential diagnosis in a case of Kikuchi's lymphadenitis includes tuberculous lymphadenitis, lupus lymphadenitis, high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, overreactive lymphadenitis, and metastatic malignancy.
Others exhibit high levels of anxiety and may be seen by physicians, psychologists, and social workers as overreactive and overprotective.
It's a little bit overreactive, as many of those things are.
If everyone encounters allergens, why do only about one out of every four people in the United States have these overreactive immune systems?
Third, the common-law method facilitates a measured development of rules in the context of specific cases and permits the incorporation of lessons learned from the early and often most overreactive stages of emergencies.
dissenting) ("These [discriminatory] statutes, for the most part, have their origin in the frantic and overreactive days of the First World War when attitudes of parochialism and fear of the foreigner were the order of the day.
Would they think I was just being an overreactive parent?