otospongiosis

otospongiosis

 [o″to-spon″je-o´sis]
the formation of spongy bone in the bony labyrinth of the ear.

o·to·spon·gi·o·sis

(ō'tō-spŏn'jē-ō'sis),
A more accurately descriptive term for the pathologic changes in otosclerosis.

otospongiosis

/oto·spon·gi·o·sis/ (o″to-spon″je-o´sis) the formation of spongy bone in the bony labyrinth of the ear.

o·to·spon·gi·o·sis

(ō'tō-spŭn-jē-ō'sis)
A more accurately descriptive term for the pathologic changes in otosclerosis.

otospongiosis

the formation of spongy bone in the bony labyrinth of the ear.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Of the remaining 20 scans, 17 showed abnormalities, includingwide vestibular aqueducts, Mondini deformities, and varying degrees of otospongiosis, the identification of which can be considered preoperatively helpful.
Otospongiosis is a common pathology within this category.
CT may also be the preferred imaging study in cases of MHL as it can accurately evaluate for otospongiosis.
Otospongiosis affects the bone of the otic capsule and is a classic example of a cause of MHL.
Otospongiosis commonly begins at the fissula antefenestrum, a cleft of fibrocartilaginous tissue just anterior to the oval window.
CT is the study of choice for evaluating suspected otospongiosis.
We prospectively studied 23 consecutive patients with tinnitus secondary to otospongiosis who had undergone stapedotomy, and we compared their pre- and postoperative medical and audiologic findings.
According to the literature, between 65 and 87% of patients with otospongiosis experience tinnitus.
Stapedotomy is primarily performed to restore hearing in patients with otospongiosis, regardless of the presence or absence of tinnitus.
Therefore, we conducted a prospective study to determine whether stapedotomy provides a significant benefit for patients with otospongiosis whose tinnitus has negative effects on their quality of life.
Tinnitus is traditionally considered to be an indication for stapedotomy in patients with otospongiosis, according to da Silva Lima et al.
Enzymatic concept of otospongiosis and cochlear otospongiosis.