osteoradionecrosis


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osteoradionecrosis

 [os″te-o-ra″de-o-nĕ-kro´sis]
necrosis of bone as a result of excessive exposure to radiation.

os·te·o·ra·di·o·ne·cro·sis

(os'tē-ō-rā'dē-ō-ne-krō'sis),
Necrosis of bone produced by ionizing radiation; may be planned or unplanned.
[osteo- + radionecrosis]

osteoradionecrosis

/os·teo·ra·dio·ne·cro·sis/ (-ra″de-o-nĕ-kro´sis) necrosis of bone as a result of exposure to radiation.

osteoradionecrosis

Degenerative pathology caused by radiation-induced cell injury, resulting in ↓ cell repair, ↓ vascularity, local hypoxia, necrosis, defective wound healing Clinical Edema, ulceration, bone necrosis, poor wound healing Management Hyperbaric O2. See Hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

os·te·o·ra·di·o·ne·cro·sis

(os'tē-ō-rā'dē-ō-nĕ-krō'sis)
Bone death produced by ionizing radiation; may be planned or unplanned.
[osteo- + radionecrosis]

os·te·o·ra·di·o·ne·cro·sis

(os'tē-ō-rā'dē-ō-nĕ-krō'sis)
Necrosis of bone produced by ionizing radiation.
[G. osteon, bone, + L. radius, ray, + G. nekrōsis, death, fr. nekros, dead]

osteoradionecrosis

necrosis of bone as a result of excessive exposure to radiation.
References in periodicals archive ?
1% (297) had at least one osteoradionecrosis code within 90 days of radiation therapy completion.
This review provides a brief discussion of the diagnostic and treatment options for osteoradionecrosis and chondroradionecrosis in the head and neck.
Osteoradionecrosis of the mandible: scientific basis for clinical staging.
The investigators concluded that although panoramic plain radiography offers good specificity in distinguishing osteonecrosis from other pathologies, and is further exceeded by both CT and MRI, none of the modalities is able to differentiate bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw from other well-established causes of exposed bone in the jaw, such as osteoradionecrosis (which also shares strikingly similar clinical features with BON), osteonecrosis secondary to osteomyelitis, or steroid-induced osteonecrosis (the latter being an uncommon occurrence).
Osteoradionecrosis of the mandible, specifically, is a very common side effect of radiation therapy of the head and neck.
One treatment to consider is the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), which is indicated in osteoradionecrosis of the jaw, a condition that occurs following a tooth extraction after the area has been radiated.
When chronic damage does occur it is referred to as either osteoradionecrosis pertaining to bone, or soft tissue radionecrosis, effecting muscle, skin, or organs.
Consequences of radiotherapy to the oral cavity also include trismus (decreased jaw mobility secondary to fibrosis of the muscles of mastication) and osteoradionecrosis (devitalized bone).
In adults receiving head and neck radiation, extract teeth that may pose a future problem to prevent extraction-induced osteoradionecrosis.
Other approved uses include treatment of exceptional blood-loss anemia, refractory osteomyelitis, soft tissue radionecrosis, osteoradionecrosis, thermal burns, and treatment of non-healing wounds (Thom 1992).
These carious teeth cannot be extracted without the danger of osteoradionecrosis [38-40].