osteochondromatosis

osteochondromatosis

 [os″te-o-kon-dro″mah-to´-sis]
the occurrence of multiple osteochondromas.

he·red·i·tar·y mul·ti·ple ex·os·to·ses

[MIM*133700]
a disturbance of endochondral bone growth in which multiple, generally benign osteochondromas of long bones appear during childhood, commonly with shortening of the radius and fibula; the skull is not involved; the ill effects are usually mechanical but malignant change is rare; autosomal dominant inheritance with genetic heterogeneity. Type I is caused by a mutation in the exostosis-1 gene (EXT1) on 8q, type II is due to mutation in the exostosis-2 gene (EXT2) and type III maps to 19p.

osteochondromatosis

/os·teo·chon·dro·ma·to·sis/ (-kon-dro″mah-to´sis) occurrence of multiple osteochondromas, sometimes specifically denoting one of the disorders multiple cartilaginous exostoses or enchondromatosis.

osteochondromatosis

[-kon′drōmətō′sis]
the transformation of synovial villi into bone and cartilage masses, causing loose bodies in the joints. It usually develops in joints affected by injury or degenerative disease.

osteochondromatosis

the occurrence of multiple osteochondromas. See multiple cartilaginous exostosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
1) Synovial osteochondromatosis: The radiographic findings of synovial osteochondromatosis consist of multiple intraarticular calcified nodules, characteristically uniform in size.
Synovial chondromatosis [1] also known as synovial osteochondromatosis is a type of non-cancerous tumour arising from the intimal layer of synovial membrane of a joint.
This tumor can be formed by one or more masses; in the latter case, it is referred to an osteochondromatosis or multiple cartilaginous exostoses (ROSA & KIRBERGER, 2012).
Natural history of multiple hereditary osteochondromatosis of the lower extremity and ankle.
SC or osteochondromatosis (when ossification is present), also called Reichel's syndrome, was first described by Reichel in 1900.
A rare case of tumoral CPPDCD of the wrist joint that required differentiation from a soft tissue tumor such as synovial osteochondromatosis is reported.
Multiple osteochondromatosis (MO) is a rare genetic disorder associated with serious complications that may significantly affect the health-related quality of life of anyone having the disorder.
Other entities that can have similar imaging findings and that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Tumoral Calcinosis include: Calcinosis Universalis, Calcinosis Cirumscripta, Calcific Tendonitis, Synovial Osteochondromatosis, Synovial Sarcoma, Osteosarcoma, Myossitis Ossificans, Tophaceous Gout and Calcific Myonecrosis.
Synovial osteochondromatosis (SOC) is a rare and benign monoarticular arthropathy characterized by multi-nodular cartilaginous proliferation in the synovium of the joint, tendon sheath or bursa.
Case report: A rare condition of secondary synovial osteochondromatosis of the shoulder joint in a young female patient.
Pseudoaneurysm associated with multiple osteochondromatosis.
The differential diagnoses of hypointense synovial masses on T2 weighted MRI are; pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), synovial osteochondromatosis, hemophilic arthropathy, and amyloid deposition.