osteoblastoma

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Related to osteoblastomas: benign osteoblastoma

osteoblastoma

 [os″te-o-blas-to´mah]
a benign, painful, rather vascular tumor of bone marked by formation of osteoid tissue and primitive bone.

os·te·o·blas·to·ma

(os'tē-ō-blas-tō'mă),
An uncommon benign tumor of osteoblasts with areas of osteoid and calcified tissue, occurring most frequently in the spine of a young person.

osteoblastoma

/os·teo·blas·to·ma/ (os″te-o-blas-to´mah) a benign, painful, rather vascular tumor of bone marked by formation of osteoid tissue and primitive bone.

osteoblastoma

[-blastō′mə] pl. osteoblastomas, osteoblastomata
a small, benign, fairly vascular tumor of poorly formed bone and fibrous tissue, occurring most frequently in the vertebrae, femur, tibia, or bones of the upper extremities in children and young adults. The tumor may cause pain, erosion, and resorption of native bone. Excision is the preferred treatment. Also called osteoid osteoma.

osteoblastoma

A bone lesion which is traditionally defined as a benign tumour of highly vascularised osteoblastic stroma, which is most common between age 5 and 25, and often located in vertebrae.
 
DiffDx
• Osteoid osteoma: Osteoblastomas are larger (over 2 cm in diameter), more axial in location, and lack imaging appearance of OOs.
• Osteosarcoma: Osteoblastomas are non-invasive, lack cartilage, have an osteosclerotic rim and looser cellularity.
• Pseudomalignant osteoblastoma: Osteoblastomas lack plump osteoblasts with “ancient change”—large nuclei with smudged nuclei.

os·te·o·blas·to·ma

(os'tē-ō-blas-tō'mă)
An uncommon benign tumor of osteoblasts with areas of osteoid and calcified tissue, occurring most frequently in the spine of a young person.

osteoblastoma (os´tēōblas´tōmə),

n a bone tumor benign in nature but characterized by swelling and chronic dull pain. If left untreated, these tumors lead to such conditions as scoliosis.

osteoblastoma

a giant osteoid osteoma; a benign, painful, rather vascular enostotic tumor of bone characterized by trabeculae of osteoid produced by well-developed osteoblasts. It has not been described in animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Osteoblastomas are larger than osteoid osteomas and appear to have unlimited growth potential.
There have been some cases of osteoblastomas reported to behave more aggressively.
Patients with osteoblastoma usually present with pain of several months' duration.
While in stage 1 (latent phase) or stage 2 (active phase) osteoblastoma, intralesional curettage is advised; marginal or wide resection is required in stage 3 (aggressive phase) (2, 4, 5).
Microscopically, it had typical features of osteoblastoma (Figure 2).
Osteoblastoma is rare, accounting for only 1% of primary bone tumors.
Seventeen specimens (38%) had areas with histologic features indistinguishable from osteoblastoma (Figure 3).
15) Osteomas may have central areas of radiolucency that in some cases correlate with woven bone with microscopic features indistinguishable from osteoblastoma.
Rarely, conventional osteoblastomas may have regions of marked cytologic atypia similar to that seen in symplastic leiomyomas or ancient neurilemmoma, so-called pseudomalignant or pseudosarcomatous changes.
Epithelioid and epithelial neoplasms seen in bone are rare and include epithelioid variants of vascular lesions, osteoblastoma, osteosarcoma, chordoma, and chondroblastoma as well as adamantinoma and metastatic carcinoma.
We report a case of intractable neck pain due to osteoblastoma involving the cervical vertebrae.
Osteoid osteoma, osteochondroma or osteoblastoma was diagnosed radiologically.