osteoblastoma

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Related to osteoblastomas: benign osteoblastoma

osteoblastoma

 [os″te-o-blas-to´mah]
a benign, painful, rather vascular tumor of bone marked by formation of osteoid tissue and primitive bone.

os·te·o·blas·to·ma

(os'tē-ō-blas-tō'mă),
An uncommon benign tumor of osteoblasts with areas of osteoid and calcified tissue, occurring most frequently in the spine of a young person.

osteoblastoma

/os·teo·blas·to·ma/ (os″te-o-blas-to´mah) a benign, painful, rather vascular tumor of bone marked by formation of osteoid tissue and primitive bone.

osteoblastoma

[-blastō′mə] pl. osteoblastomas, osteoblastomata
a small, benign, fairly vascular tumor of poorly formed bone and fibrous tissue, occurring most frequently in the vertebrae, femur, tibia, or bones of the upper extremities in children and young adults. The tumor may cause pain, erosion, and resorption of native bone. Excision is the preferred treatment. Also called osteoid osteoma.

osteoblastoma

A bone lesion which is traditionally defined as a benign tumour of highly vascularised osteoblastic stroma, which is most common between age 5 and 25, and often located in vertebrae.
 
DiffDx
• Osteoid osteoma: Osteoblastomas are larger (over 2 cm in diameter), more axial in location, and lack imaging appearance of OOs.
• Osteosarcoma: Osteoblastomas are non-invasive, lack cartilage, have an osteosclerotic rim and looser cellularity.
• Pseudomalignant osteoblastoma: Osteoblastomas lack plump osteoblasts with “ancient change”—large nuclei with smudged nuclei.

os·te·o·blas·to·ma

(os'tē-ō-blas-tō'mă)
An uncommon benign tumor of osteoblasts with areas of osteoid and calcified tissue, occurring most frequently in the spine of a young person.

osteoblastoma (os´tēōblas´tōmə),

n a bone tumor benign in nature but characterized by swelling and chronic dull pain. If left untreated, these tumors lead to such conditions as scoliosis.

osteoblastoma

a giant osteoid osteoma; a benign, painful, rather vascular enostotic tumor of bone characterized by trabeculae of osteoid produced by well-developed osteoblasts. It has not been described in animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
High-grade osteoblastomas are characterized by histologic findings of epithelioid osteoblasts, increased mitotic activity within the stromal component, and a disordered osteoid matrix.
The differential diagnosis of petrous apex tumors includes chondrosarcoma, schwannoma, paraganglioma, and primary bony tumors such as osteoblastoma and osteosarcoma.
Osteoblastoma presents as a diagnostic dilemma and difficult to differentiate from other benign bone forming tumors.
In aggressive osteoblastoma the features are similar to benign osteoblastoma except for the morphology of osteoblasts which are large and have epitheloid appearance.
Overall, osteoblastomas are more commonly encountered in males, and the mean age of incidence is approximately 20 years.
Osteoblastomas do not always have specific radiological findings to refine the diagnosis.
3,6,7,9) Sometimes, osteoblastomas may be asymptomatic and are diagnosed incidentally.
We aim to share our case of osteoblastoma of the lumbar spine as a rare cause of chronic low back pain in addition to contributions of Ucan et al's case which is entitled with Schwannoma in three patients with low back pain (1).
Because most osteoblastomas are treated by curettage, the gross specimen usually consists of fragments of red gritty tissue.
However, unlike osteoblastomas, which form expansile, partially calcified tumors, osteomas with osteoblastoma-like features form heavily ossified masses with a less radiodense center that tend to grow as intracavitary polypoid tumors.
59) Epithelioid morphology correlates strongly with multifocal lesions, typically as multiple nidi in the same bone, with more than half of multifocal lesions having epithelioid histology; conversely, two thirds of epithelioid osteoblastomas are multifocal.