osmosis


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Related to osmosis: reverse osmosis, diffusion

osmosis

 [oz-mo´sis, os-mo´sis]
the diffusion of pure solvent across a membrane in response to a concentration gradient, usually from a solution of lesser to one of greater solute concentration. adj., adj osmot´ic.

The process of osmosis and the factors that influence it are important clinically in the maintenance of adequate body fluids and in the proper balance between volumes of extracellular and intracellular fluids.

The term osmotic pressure refers to the amount of pressure necessary to stop the flow of water across the membrane. The hydrostatic pressure of the water exerts an opposite effect; that is, it exerts pressure in favor of the flow of water across the membrane. The osmotic pressure of the particles in a solute depends on the relative concentrations of the solutions on either side of the membrane, and on the area of the membrane. The osmotic pressure exerted by the nondiffusible particles in a solution is determined by the numbers of particles in a unit of fluid and not by the mass of the particles.
If the solution surrounding a cell has the same solute concentration as the internal environment of the cell (isotonic), the flow rates in and out of the cell are the same, and the cell remains the same size. If the solute concentration outside the cell is lower (hypotonic), more water will flow into the cell than out, and the cell will swell and perhaps burst. If the solute concentration outside the cell is greater (hypertonic), more water will flow out of the cell than into it, and the cell will shrivel.
Demonstration of osmotic pressure on the two sides of a semipermeable membrane.

os·mo·sis

(os-mō'sis),
The process by which solvent tends to move through a semipermeable membrane from a solution of lower to a solution of higher osmolal concentration of the solutes to which the membrane is relatively impermeable.
[G. ōsmos, a thrusting, an impulsion]

osmosis

/os·mo·sis/ (oz-mo´sis) (os-mo´sis) the diffusion of pure solvent across a membrane in response to a concentration gradient, usually from a solution of lesser to one of greater solute concentration.osmot´ic

osmosis

(ŏz-mō′sĭs, ŏs-)
n. pl. osmo·ses (-sēz)
1.
a. Diffusion of fluid through a semipermeable membrane from a solution with a low solute concentration to a solution with a higher solute concentration until there is an equal solute concentration on both sides of the membrane.
b. The tendency of fluids to diffuse in such a manner.
2. A gradual, often unconscious process of assimilation or absorption: learned French by osmosis while residing in Paris for 15 years.

os·mot′ic (-mŏt′ĭk) adj.
os·mot′i·cal·ly adv.

osmosis (osm)

[ozmō′sis, os-]
Etymology: Gk, ōsmos, impulse, osis, condition
the movement of a pure solvent such as water through a differentially permeable membrane from a solution that has a lower solute concentration to one that has a higher solute concentration. The membrane is impermeable to the solute but is permeable to the solvent. The rate of osmosis depends on the concentration of solute, the temperature of the solution, the electrical charge of the solute, and the difference between the osmotic pressures exerted by the solutions. Movement across the membrane continues until the concentrations of the solutions equalize. osmotic (osm), adj.
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Osmosis

os·mo·sis

(oz-mō'sis)
The process by which solvent tends to move through a semipermeable membrane from a solution of lower to a solution of higher osmolal concentration of the solutes to which the membrane is relatively impermeable.
[G. ōsmos, a thrusting, an impulsion]

osmosis

(oz-mō′sĭs) [Gr. osmos, impulse, + osis, condition]
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OSMOSIS
The passage of solvent through a semipermeable membrane that separates solutions of different concentrations. The solvent, usually water, passes through the membrane from the region of lower concentration of solute to that of a higher concentration of solute, thus tending to equalize the concentrations of the two solutions. The rate of osmosis is dependent primarily upon the difference in osmotic pressures of the solutions on the two sides of a membrane, the permeability of the membrane, and the electric potential across the membrane and the charge upon the walls of the pores in it. See: illustration

reverse osmosis

A form of water treatment that removes infectious particles and dissolved ions more effectively than other water purification techniques. Water so purified can be used in hemodialysis.
osmotic (oz-mot′ik), adjectiveillustration

osmosis

The automatic movement of the fluid part of a solution through a membrane, separating two quantities of the solution, in such a direction as to dilute the solution of higher concentration. The membrane is permeable to the liquid but not to the dissolved substance. Such a membrane is said to be semipermeable and membranes of this kind occur widely in the body. Osmosis is an important principle on which much of physiology is based.

osmosis

the movement of a solvent (water in biological systems) through a differentially permeable membrane from a solution with high water concentration and low solute concentration, to one with a low water concentration and high solute concentration.

osmosis

passage of a solvent from a weak solution to a strong solution across a selectively permeable membrane

osmosis 

A passive process of movement of water through a semipermeable membrane in response to a concentration gradient, from an area of low solute (e.g. glucose molecules) concentration (i.e. high water concentration) to one of high solute concentration (i.e. low water concentration). The membrane is permeable to water but relatively impermeable to solutes. See osmotic pressure; hypertonic solution.

os·mo·sis

(os-mō'sis)
Process by which solvent tends to move through a semipermeable membrane from a solution of lower to a solution of higher osmolal concentration of solutes to which membrane is relatively impermeable.
[G. ōsmos, a thrusting, an impulsion]

osmosis (ozmō´sis),

n the passage of pure solvent from the lesser to the greater concentration when two solutions are separated by a membrane that selectively prevents the passage of solute molecules but is permeable to the solvent. The principles of osmosis and the selective permeability of the cell membrane help to regulate the transfer of fluids and metabolites to and from the cells. Thus, they also maintain the stability of the salt/ion concentration in the extracellular and intracellular fluids.

osmosis

[Gr.] the passage of pure solvent from a solution of lesser to one of greater solute concentration when the two solutions are separated by a membrane which selectively prevents the passage of solute molecules, but is permeable to the solvent.
The process of osmosis and the factors that influence it are important clinically in the maintenance of adequate body fluids and in the proper balance between volumes of extracellular and intracellular fluids.
The term osmotic pressure refers to the amount of pressure necessary to stop the flow of water across the membrane. The hydrostatic pressure of the water exerts an opposite effect; that is, it exerts pressure in favor of the flow of water across the membrane. The osmotic pressure of the particles in a solute depends on the relative concentrations of the solutions on either side of the membrane, and on the area of the membrane. The osmotic pressure exerted by the nondiffusible particles in a solution is determined by the numbers of particles in a unit of fluid and not by the mass of the particles.
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Osmosis. By permission from Guyton R, Hall JE, Textbook of Medical Physiology, Saunders, 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
In this particular case the power consumption is less than 50 per cent of conventional processes and has all the inherent advantages of low fouling attributable to the forward osmosis process,' said Nicoll.
To evaluate the reusing potential of treated effluent at the Tanning process, samples was collected from the outlet of Activated carbon filter and outlet of Reverse Osmosis Plant during the month of Feb.
In partnership with WETICO Saudi Berkefeld, the recently-launched Shoaiba Barge SeaWater Reverse Osmosis (SWRO) plant in Saudi Arabia is projected to be Saudi ArabiaCOs first large-scale reverse osmosis seawater desalination plant and the worldCOs largest sea-based desalination plant.
Often used to remove salts, reverse osmosis requires electricity to pump water through semipermeable membranes.
In mills with a high potential for impacting boiler cycles with the implementation of a reverse osmosis system, energy management will drive the decision," suggested Graham.
The virus wreaks havoc with Frank's insides and it's up to the heroic cartoon cop Osmosis Jones to save the day.
Birgit Becker, the German-born owner of Osmosis, said: "Around 65pc of our business is from corporate clients who order fresh displays of flowers for meetings and the like.
Explicit instruction empowers students in their journey into academia and into disciplines; it allows them to sidestep the slow process of osmosis and to make the most of their intellectual potential.
We are very pleased with the achievement of this huge milestone in the evolution of Forward Osmosis technology," said Walt Schultz, CEO of HTI.
Degremont has chosen Dow Water and Process Solutions due to the unique and innovative technology of its energy efficient advanced DOW Ultrafiltration and Reverse Osmosis membranes.
Bahrain-based MIT International and British chemical firm Genesys will showcase 'Genairclean' during a technical seminar on "Reducing the cost and optimising the performance of reverse osmosis desalination systems", which is being held at the Gulf Hotel from 10am to 1pm, said a report in the Gulf Daily News (GDN), our sister publication.
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