osmolar

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osmolar

 [oz-mo´lar]
pertaining to the concentration of osmotically active particles in solution.

os·mot·ic

(oz-mot'ik),
Relating to osmosis.
Synonym(s): osmolar

osmolar

/os·mo·lar/ (oz-mo´ler) pertaining to the concentration of osmotically active particles in solution.

osmolar

[osmō′lər]
pertaining to the osmotic characteristics of a solution of one or more molecular substances, ionic substances, or both, expressed in osmoles or milliosmoles.

os·mot·ic

(oz-mot'ik)
Relating to osmosis.
Synonym(s): osmolar.

osmolar

Having a concentration of 1 OSMOLE per litre.

os·mot·ic

(os-mot'ik)
Relating to osmosis.
Synonym(s): osmolar.

osmolar

pertaining to the concentration of osmotically active particles in solution.

osmolar gap
the difference between the calculated and measured osmolality of a solution. The gap is due to laboratory error or to disease states.
References in periodicals archive ?
The diagnosis is based on the presence of severe metabolic acidosis with high anion and osmolar gap and high serum methanol levels4.
25) In psittacine bird species, the osmolar gap has the same theoretical use as in mammals for diagnosing certain toxicoses, but the occurrence of these types of toxicoses in pet birds (eg, ethylene glycol, methanol, paraldehyde) is rare and largely unreported, except in anseriformes and galliformes.
Age, sex, type of poisoning, EG and MTH levels, degree of acidosis, initial anion gap (AG) and osmolar gap (OG), need for mechanical ventilation, antidote use, renal dysfunction, need for dialysis, and length of hospital stay were recorded.
All patients had an increased anion gap metabolic acidosis and osmolar gap, (excluding one patient for whom data were unavailable) with a mean anion gap of 21 meq/l (range 15 to 31) and mean osmolar gap of 48 mOsm/l (range 29 to 81) correspondingly.
The parent compound contributes to the osmolar gap because it is osmotically active and has a relatively small molecular weight.
All patients admitted with EG or MTH poisoning had an elevated osmolar gap (except patient number nine where the OG data were unavailable, Table 1).
As it turns out, the subsequent labs showed a decrease in the osmolar gap to 8 and venous ph staying within normal limits.
However, in the acute setting of managing the intoxicated patient, the use of serum ethylene glycol (determined enzymatically on an automated analyzer (7,8), anion and osmolar gaps coupled with arterial blood gases measurements will provide the greatest diagnostic yield at lowest cost.