orthopnea


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Related to orthopnea: paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, platypnea, orthopneic position, Trepopnea

orthopnea

 [or″thop-ne´ah]
dyspnea that is relieved in the upright position; see also platypnea.

or·thop·ne·a

(ōr'thop-nē'ă, ōr-thop'nē-ă), In the diphthong pn, the p is silent only at the beginning of a word. Although orthopne'a is the correct pronunciation, the alternative pronunciation orthop'nea is widespread in the U.S.
Discomfort in breathing that is brought on or aggravated by lying flat. Compare: platypnea.
[ortho- + G. pnoē, a breathing]

orthopnea

/or·thop·nea/ (or″thop-ne´ah) dyspnea that is relieved in the upright position.orthopne´ic

orthopnea

[ôrthop′nē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, orthos + pnoia, breath
an abnormal condition in which a person must sit or stand to breathe deeply or comfortably. It occurs in many disorders of the cardiac and respiratory systems, such as asthma, pulmonary edema, emphysema, pneumonia, congestive heart failure, and angina pectoris. Assessment includes noting the number of pillows used by the patient. Patients with orthopnea also report sleeping in recliners. Also spelled orthopnoea. See also dyspnea. orthopneic, adj.

orthopnea

Clinical medicine Dyspnea in a Pt with moderate CHF, due to ↑ venous return from failing ventricles; such Pts breathe better when sitting straight or standing erect

or·thop·ne·a

(ōr-thop'nē'ă)
Discomfort in breathing that is brought on or aggravated by lying flat.
Compare: platypnea
Synonym(s): orthopnoea.
[ortho- + G. pnoē, a breathing]

Orthopnea

Difficulty in breathing that occurs while the patient is lying down.
Mentioned in: Shortness of Breath

or·thop·ne·a

(ōr-thop'nē'ă)
Discomfort in breathing that is brought on or aggravated by lying flat.
Synonym(s): orthopnoea.
[ortho- + G. pnoē, a breathing]

orthopnea (ôr´thopnē´ə),

n an inability to breathe except in an upright position.

orthopnea

ability to breathe easily only while standing, seen in congestive heart failure.

orthopneic position
dogs with congestive heart failure will resist lying down, preferring to stand or sit in order to relieve pulmonary congestion.
References in periodicals archive ?
At 1 year, 3 patients continued to experience substantial orthopnea and dyspnea on exertion, and 2 had no respiratory symptoms.
The only respiratory symptom at this first visit was intermittent orthopnea, which he reported as a relatively new symptom that was not problematic.
The majority of the study patients consulted their GP for dyspnea on exertion and/or lower-extremity edema (71%), whereas only 29% complained of dyspnea at rest and/or orthopnea.
There was associated orthopnea and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea.
When we performed a logistic regression with acute destabilized HF as the dependent variable and age, sex, eGFR, history of acute destabilized HF, and the presence of orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, nocturnal cough, jugular venous distension, pulmonary rales, third heart sound, and peripheral edema as independent variables (excluding MR-proANP, BNP, and NT-proBNP), we obtained a diagnostic accuracy of 79% for this statistical model.
Background: An 85-year-old male with known coronary artery disease and chronic moderate LV systolic dysfunction presented with acute worsening of dyspnea and orthopnea, associated with intermittent aching left sided chest pain of 5 minutes' duration.
A 71-year-old female patient was admitted to emergency unit with severe dyspnea, angina, and orthopnea symptoms in the preceding 5 days.
A 66-year-old man presented to his primary care practitioner after 1 week of worsening shortness of breath associated with cough, orthopnea, palpitations, and malaise.
dyspnea on exertion, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, nocturnal cough, jugular venous distension, pulmonary rales, third heart sound, and peripheral edema), prosthetic valves, pericardial disease, pulmonary embolism, acute stroke or actual transient or temporary stroke, and congenital heart disease.
Accordingly, the major criteria are paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, orthopnea, elevated jugular venous pressure, pulmonary rales, third heart sound, cardiomegaly on chest X-ray, pulmonary edema on chest X-ray, weight loss [greater than or equal to] 4.
Over the ensuing 8 months, the patient had angina pectoris for the first time and gradually developed exertional dyspnea, fatigue, orthopnea, and marked peripheral edema.