orthogenesis

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or·tho·gen·e·sis

(ōr'thō-jen'ĕ-sis),
The doctrine that evolution is governed by intrinsic factors and occurs in predictable directions.
[ortho- + G. genesis, origin]

orthogenesis

(ôr′thō-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
1. Biology The hypothesis, now largely discredited, that the evolution of species is linear and driven largely by internal factors rather than by natural selection.
2. Anthropology The hypothesis that all cultures evolve in a linear manner from primitivism to civilization.

or′tho·ge·net′ic (-jə-nĕt′ĭk) adj.
or′tho·ge·net′i·cal·ly adv.

orthogenesis

[ôr′thəjen′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, orthos + genesis, origin
the theory that evolution is controlled by intrinsic factors within the organism and progresses according to a predetermined course rather than in several directions as a result of natural selection and other environmental factors. orthogenetic, adj.

orthogenesis

a discredited theory of evolution which held that development took place along predetermined lines unaffected by selective processes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Applied to personal constructs, the orthogenetic principle suggests that more developed systems of constructs will be more differentiated (contain greater numbers of constructs), articulated (consist of more refined elements), abstract and integrated (organized and interconnected).
There is little point in reviewing the content of the already-published essays, especially since the orthogenetic interpretive framework deployed in them looks increasingly antique, as do the bias against rhetoric and in favor of "science," the bloody-minded quest for "reality" beneath the texts, the construction of "traditions" (complete with assessment of points for "contributions") and so forth.
16) They make use of old anthropological categories, orthogenetic and heterogenetic cultures, and infuse new life into these concepts by linking them to two broad types of urban system: the "central place system" and the "network system.
Of particular interest here is the cultural role of such cities; their influence tends toward what the anthropologists Redfield and Singer called the orthogenetic.
While the orthogenetic capital is the highest expression of the national culture, the heterogenetic capital is a place of exception, a source of novelty, a threat to the local culture.