orthodontics

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Related to orthodontic therapy: orthodontia

orthodontics

 [or″tho-don´tiks]
the branch of dentistry concerned with growth and development of orofacial structures, including irregularities of teeth, malocclusion, and associated facial problems.

or·tho·don·tics

(ōr'thō-don'tiks),
That branch of dentistry concerned with the correction and prevention of irregularities and malocclusion of the teeth.
[ortho- + G. odous, tooth]

orthodontics

/or·tho·don·tics/ (-don´tiks) the branch of dentistry concerned with irregularities of teeth and malocclusion, and associated facial abnormalities.orthodon´tic

orthodontics

(ôr′thə-dŏn′tĭks)
n.
(used with a sing. verb) The dental specialty dealing with correction of irregularities of the teeth, such as malocclusion, often by the use of braces.

or′tho·don′tic adj.
or′tho·don′ti·cal·ly adv.
or′tho·don′tist n.

orthodontics

Dentistry A specialty of dentistry involved in correcting dental and, less commonly, dentofacial defects

or·tho·don·tics

(ōr'thŏ-don'tiks)
That branch of dentistry concerned with the correction and prevention of irregularities and malocclusion of the teeth.
[ortho- + G. odous, tooth]

orthodontics

The dental speciality concerned with the correction of irregularities of tooth placement and in the relationship of the upper teeth to the lower (occlusion). Teeth can readily be permanently moved by sustained pressure using braces, springs, wires and harnesses.

or·tho·don·tics

(ōr'thŏ-don'tiks)
Branch of dentistry concerned with correction and prevention of irregularities and malocclusion of the teeth.
Synonym(s): dental orthopedics, orthodontia.
[ortho- + G. odous, tooth]

orthodontics (ôr´thədän´tiks),

n the area of dentistry concerned with the supervision, guidance, and correction of the growing and mature orofacial structures. This includes conditions that require movement of the teeth or correction of malrelationships and malformations of related structures by the adjustment of relationships between and among teeth and facial bones by the application of forces or the stimulation and redirection of functional forces within the craniofacial complex. Major responsibilities of the practice include (1) the diagnosis, prevention, interception, and treatment of all forms of malocclusion of the teeth and associated alterations in their surrounding structures; (2) design, application, and control of functional and corrective appliances; and (3) guidance of the dentition and its supporting structures to attain and maintain optimum occlusal relations in physiologic and esthetic harmony among facial and cranial structures. Also called
dentofacial orthopedics.

orthodontics, orthodontia

that branch of dentistry concerned with irregularities of teeth and malocclusion.
References in periodicals archive ?
At this stage, the patient also expressed the unwillingness to continue the orthodontic therapy.
Effects of first premolar extraction on maxillary and mandibular third molar angulation after orthodontic therapy.
If the inflamed gingival enlargement includes a significant fibrotic component that does not undergo shrinkage after scaling and root planing or are of such size that they obscure deposition on the tooth surfaces and interfere with access to them, then gingivectomy may be the treatment of choice which is likely to produce a satisfactory result in patients undergoing orthodontic therapy.
21) Following fixed orthodontic therapy, the gingiva of the central incisor was brought close to the level of that of the adjacent central incisor, thus eliminating the need for gingival plastic surgery.
4,11,16 It is proposed that the patients undergoing orthodontic therapy can have the variation in the biological process involved in tooth movement.
There are many reasons why adult orthodontic therapy should be encouraged, including the improvement of function and occlusion, and improvement of esthetics, as well as the psychological aspects.
The effect of extraction treatment on the vertical facial pattern to overcome the extrusive nature of fixed orthodontic therapy has long been questioned in the orthodontic literature.
Any changes in the pre-existing Lip-Gingival-tooth" relationship was thought to require orthodontic therapy in conjunction with orthognathic surgery or aggressive periodontal procedures.
Analysis of Dental Supportive Structures in Orthodontic Therapy.
2 Orthodontic therapy reduces caries suscep- tibility, periodontal problems, TMDs, dental trauma and raises psychological and social self-esteem.
Comprehensive fixed-appliance orthodontic therapy performed during adolescence does generally not increase or decrease the risk of developing TMJ disorders in later life.
Pharmacological support during orthodontic therapy with a topical anti-inflammatory.

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