oropharyngeal dysphagia


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Related to oropharyngeal dysphagia: Esophageal dysphagia

dysphagia

 [dis-fa´jah]
difficulty in swallowing; see also aphagia. There are numerous underlying causes, including stroke and other neurologic conditions, local trauma and muscle damage, and a tumor or swelling that partially obstructs the passage of food. The condition can range from mild discomfort, such as a feeling that there is a lump in the throat, to a severe inability to control the muscles needed for chewing and swallowing.

Dysphagia can seriously compromise the nutritional status of a patient. Temporary measures such as tube feeding and parenteral nutrition can remedy the immediate problem, but long-term goals for rehabilitation must focus on helping the patient recover the ability to swallow sufficient amounts of food and drink to assure adequate nutrition.

Measures intended to accomplish the goal of oral feeding are implemented only after determining the particular techniques that are most helpful for the individual patient. In general, placing the patient in an upright position, providing a pleasant and calm environment, being sure the lips are closed as the patient begins to swallow, and preparing and serving foods of the proper consistency are all helpful techniques. Stroke victims who have difficulty swallowing should be turned, or should turn their heads, to the unaffected side to facilitate swallowing. If dry mouth is a problem, there are artificial salivas available to moisten and lubricate the mouth. When drinking fluids, dysphagic patients should sip the liquid in small amounts.
esophageal dysphagia dysphagia caused by an abnormality in the esophagus, such as a smooth muscle disorder that interferes with peristalsis or an obstruction from external compression or a stricture.
oropharyngeal dysphagia dysphagia caused by difficulty in initiating the swallowing process, so that solids and liquids cannot move out of the mouth properly.

oropharyngeal dysphagia

[ôr′ōfərin′jē·əl]
difficulty in either the oral or pharyngeal phases of swallowing, such as in chewing, initiating the swallow, or propelling the bolus through the pharynx to the esophagus. It is caused by multiple neurological, structural, or other medical conditions.

oropharyngeal dysphagia

Difficulty in propelling food or liquid from the oral cavity into the esophagus.
Synonym: transfer dysphagia
See also: dysphagia

dysphagia

difficulty in swallowing.

cricopharyngeal dysphagia
see cricopharyngeal achalasia.
esophageal dysphagia
difficulty in swallowing due to esophageal malfunction.
gastroesophageal dysphagia
impaired passage of the bolus through the caudal esophageal sphincter.
neuropathic dysphagia
may be caused by lesions of the glossopharyngeal or vagus nerves or associated nuclei of the caudal medulla oblongata.
oropharyngeal dysphagia
abnormalities in mastication and pharyngeal contraction may be caused by hypoglossal nerve dysfunction, polyneuropathy, polymyositis, meningitis, brainstem lesions and generalized neuromuscular disease.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of therapy in oropharyngeal dysphagia by speech and language therapists: A systematic review.
Oropharyngeal Dysphagia and Gross Motor Skills in Children With Cerebral Palsy.
This systematic review is part of an EBSR series that systematically examined the peer-reviewed literature evaluating the effects of behavioral-based intervention maneuvers or postural changes on the physiology, functionality, and pulmonary health of persons with oropharyngeal dysphagia.
Screening for oropharyngeal dysphagia in stroke: Insufficient evidence for guidelines.
Lower respiratory tract infections are probably the most severe adverse events that are related to dysphagia in the early period after stroke, and it is more common in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia and aspiration (32).
In recent years, multiple studies have investigated the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia and dysphagiarelated consequences for individuals' postcancer treatments [1-6].
In the fall of 2007, N-CEP and the VA initiated a series of EBSRs examining the current state of behavioral treatments for oropharyngeal dysphagia.
Therefore, one should be cautious when interpreting these findings (significance vs nonsignificance of pharyngeal contraction pressure and duration), since they are clearly sensitive to slight differences in measurement and may not be important changes to consider when the chin tuck is used with specific types of oropharyngeal dysphagia.