orientation


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orientation

 [o″re-en-ta´shun]
1. awareness of one's environment, with reference to place, time, and people.
2. attraction or tendency.
3. the relative positions of atoms or groups in chemical compounds.
4. a planned series of classes and educational experiences on patient care units to acquaint a newly employed health care provider with routines, protocols, and expectations.
reality orientation see reality orientation.
topographical orientation determination of the location of objects and settings and the route to the location.

or·i·en·ta·tion

(ōr'ē-en-tā'shŭn),
1. The recognition of one's temporal, spatial, and personal relationships and environment.
2. The relative position of an atom with respect to another atom to which it is connected, that is, the direction of the bond connecting them.
[Fr. orienter, to set toward the east, therefore in a definite position]

orientation

/ori·en·ta·tion/ (or″e-en-ta´shun)
1. awareness of one's environment with reference to time, place, and people.
2. the relative positions of atoms or groups in a chemical compound.

orientation

(ôr′ē-ĕn-tā′shən, -ən-)
n.
1. The act of orienting or the state of being oriented.
2. Sexual orientation.
3.
a. An adjustment or adaptation to a new environment, situation, custom, or set of ideas.
b. Introductory instruction concerning a new situation: orientation for incoming students.
4. Psychology Awareness of the objective world in relation to one's self.

orientation

[ôr′ē·əntā′shən]
Etymology: L, oriens + itio, process
1 the direction of a fragment of nucleic acid inserted into a vector. The orientation of the fragment may be the same as that of the genetic map of the vector (the n orientation) or opposite (the u orientation).
2 the awareness of one's physical environment with regard to time, place, and the identity of other people; the ability to adapt to such an existing or new environment. Disorientation is usually a symptom of organic brain disease and most psychoses.

orientation

Neurology The state of being oriented; the knowledge of one's self, and present situation–eg,  awareness of one's environment with reference to time, place, and interpersonal relationships Vox populi Proclivity, tendency; mien. See Sexual orientation.

or·i·en·ta·tion

(ōr'ē-ĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. The recognition of one's temporal, spatial, and personal relationships and environment.
2. The relative position of an atom with respect to one to which it is connected.

orientation

  1. The response of an organism in taking up a particular position in relation to a particular stimulus.
  2. see NAVIGATION.

or·i·en·ta·tion

(ōr'ē-ĕn-tā'shŭn)
Recognition of one's temporal, spatial, and personal relationships and environment.

orientation,

n the ability to correctly place oneself in time, space, and relationship to others and one's work and environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Similar to past research examining links between ego orientation and beliefs about USP, higher ego orientation predicted higher USP intention (Dunn & Causgrove Dunn, 1999; Kavussanu & Roberts, 2001; Sage et al.
Most of the companies today make typical mistakes when it comes to designing and having a carefully crafted orientation agenda.
By this definition, AF = 1 in the limit of perfect orientation along the primary filling direction, while AF = 1 for perfect orientation transverse to the filling direction.
The revised orientation session included the following components:
Neither the orientation number nor the orientation profile are material properties, as they also depend on the projection direction.
More recently, researchers have found that greater levels of market orientation result in a greater organizational ability to achieve its objectives (Houston 1986; Narver & Slater 1990; Jaworski & Kohli 1993; Kohli & Jaworski 1993; Siguaw et al.
how are the combinations described in terms of magnitude and balance of market orientation exhibited toward the three markets, balance of emphasis between the market orientation components, and relative emphasis of customer orientation and competitor orientation?
We collected data by using MTx orientation sensors (XSens).
A customer orientation is viewed as the sufficient understanding of a firm's target customers to be able to create superior value for them continuously; it requires that a firm understands a customer's entire value-chain, as it is today and as it will evolve over time.
PRINCIPLE OF ESTIMATION OF THE LOCAL ORIENTATION IN IMAGES
Orientation, she argues, depends on the pre-established lines of orientation at our disposal.
It says, "Adolescent students are not always the best judges of their own sexual orientation.