organum


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organ

 [or´gan]
accessory digestive o's (accessory o's of digestive system) organs and structures not part of the alimentary canal that aid in digestion; they include the teeth, salivary glands, liver, gallbladder, and pancreas.
organ of Corti the organ lying against the basilar membrane in the cochlear duct, containing special sensory receptors for hearing, and consisting of neuroepithelial hair cells and several types of supporting cells.
effector organ a muscle or gland that contracts or secretes, respectively, in direct response to nerve impulses.
enamel organ a process of epithelium forming a cap over a dental papilla and developing into the enamel.
end organ end-organ.
Golgi tendon organ any of the mechanoreceptors arranged in series with muscle in the tendons of mammalian muscles, being the receptor for stimuli responsible for the lengthening reaction.
sense o's (sensory o's) organs that receive stimuli that give rise to sensations, i.e., organs that translate certain forms of energy into nerve impulses that are perceived as special sensations.
spiral organ organ of Corti.
target organ the organ affected by a particular hormone.
vestigial organ an undeveloped organ that, in the embryo or in some remote ancestor, was well developed and functional.
o's of Zuckerkandl para-aortic bodies.

or·gan

(ōr'găn), [TA]
Any part of the body exercising a specific function (for example, respiration, secretion, or digestion).
Synonym(s): organum [TA], organon
[L. organum, fr. G. organon, a tool, instrument]

organum

See organ.

or·gan

(ōr'găn) [TA]
A differentiated structure or part of a system of the body; composed of tissues and cells; exercises a specific function (e.g., respiration, secretion, digestion).
Synonym(s): organum [TA] , organon.
[L. organum, fr. G. organon, a tool, instrument]

or·gan

(ōr'găn) [TA]
A differentiated structure or part of a system of the body; composed of tissues and cells.
Synonym(s): organum [TA] , organon.
[L. organum, fr. G. organon, a tool, instrument]

organum

pl. organa [L.] an organ; a somewhat independent part of the body that performs a special function.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Tertium Organum, he writes: "This last brings us to a totally new view of morality.
Schutz was famously reluctant to provide continuo support for what is in many respects a continuation of the prima prattica: in his prefatory note to the reader he describes the continuo part as having been "wrested" (extorsit) from him by the printer, and cautions organists that he considered the simple application of bassus ad organum to be "vain and clumsy" (vanum atq[ue] inconcinnum), preferring instead that organists transcribe the full vocal texture into score (voces omnes in Partituram seu Tabulaturam .
Baltzer and Mark Everist) have been far more deeply involved with the repertory of organum duplum than I, but it remains my sense that that body of works began life as a product of an essentially oral, improvisatory culture, and that the earliest performances were governed by principles akin to those described by Milman Parry and Albert Bates Lord with regard to southern European oral epics (Serbocroatian Heroic Songs [Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1953-79]).
At the outset, when organum was a cutting-edge genre, religion firmly bound the community together, though increased self-consciousness made itself felt as early as Guillaume Du Fay's Ave regina caelorum III where an insertion made by the composer names him as a suppliant for God's mercy.
A later theoretical treatise, Ad organum faciendum, (5) was also represented by two pieces in the old anthologies of music.
She offers transcriptions of selected Ordinary chants, as well as all five Prosae (Nato canunt, Adest precelsa, Celeste organum, Gaude roma, and Petre summe), the two Responsory Prosae (Inviolata Maria intacta, Velut in talamo rutilat), the seventeen hymns and five polyphonic pieces (Gloria.
Fritz Reckow, in "Guido's Theory of Organum after Guido: Transmission, Adaptation, Transformation," attributes the continued use and influence of the Micrologus in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries to Guido's statement of "pragmatic principles" rather than "absolute norms" for the performance of polyphony, and to the performance of older types of polyphony even into the high middle ages.
Thus, we find the twelfth- and thirteenth-century Parisian organum and motet repertory preserved in a manuscript from the British Isles and a remarkably representative collection of French motet styles of the late fourteenth and fifteenth centuries in a manuscript that probably came from Cyprus.
This arrangement is essentially that in F, but expanded by the insertion of each of the Notre-Dame clausulae after the appropriate organum.
In the twentieth century, however, his name has been better known to organists than his music, despite the availability of Max Seiffert's edition of fourteen preludes, fugues, and toccatas in Organum, series 4, number 3 (Leipzig: F.
The greatest portion of the manuscript is devoted to the conductus, but the motet and four-voice organum also figure significantly.
This is not to say that his arguments in favor of notationless creation are not plausible when applied to this repertory, but one could with equal justice claim that most of the "methods" for composing polyphony based on preexistent melodies--the Musica enchiriadis, Ad organum faciendum, and Vatican organum treatises, to name some of the most important--are all methods for producing extempore polyphony by ear.