organology

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organology

 [or″gah-nol´ŏ-je]
the sum of what is known regarding the body organs.

or·ga·nol·o·gy

(ōr'gă-nol'ŏ-jē),
Branch of science concerned with the anatomy, physiology, development, and functions of the various organs.
See also: splanchnology.
[organo- + G. logos, study]

organology

(ôr′gə-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The branch of biology that deals with the structure and function of organs.
2. The branch of musicology that deals with musical instruments and their construction, acoustic properties, classification, history, and broader cultural context.

or′gan·o·log′ic (ôr′gə-nə-lŏj′ĭk, ôr-găn′ə-), or′gan·o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

organology

the sum of what is known regarding the body organs.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is ironic that, at an international conference attended by specialists in instrument construction and preservation, perhaps the strongest impression was made by the distinguished organologist who studiously mangled and dismembered a new instrument, to the cheers of all who watched.
Inevitably incomplete, the addresses, telephone numbers, and names of contacts alone make this a candidate for the shelves of every ethnomusicologist, organologist, and sound archivist.
The media ecology perspective on culture would surely well serve the organologists, if not simply to bring perspective to the profundity of the shift from pre-electric humanity to our selves.
This trove of raw data cannot easily be read and assimilated, but it is of enormous potential value to organologists, collectors, curators, and music historians.
detail aspects of harpsichords produced from 1680 to 1725 from a variety of makers, including several single-manual instruments; stringed keyboard instruments from the workshops of eighteenth-century maker Ferdinand Weber, including harpsichords, spinets, and pianos; and criteria for the determination of original stringing in historical keyboard instruments, to help curators, organologists, and restorers in identification.
The two papers on Stein illustrate the problems of conservation and restoration confronting curators and organologists.
As a result, people have been identified who were previously unknown to organologists and a broader picture of musical-instrument making is emerging.
Regular readers of VIM (who will recognize some of these pictures), curious players of the trump, and students of folk music will find this extensive, often delightful compilation especially intriguing, but its subject matter should also interest musicologists and ethnomusicologists, art historians and iconographers, organologists, and anyone concerned with northern European and American cultural history.
It is very attractive to suppose there were literally rules of thumb, and many organologists today explore instruments employing the scale of inches of a particular place and time.
The work of organologists like Bordas prompts us to reflect on the burning need for the conservation, preservation, and study of Spain's material musical past, especially musical instruments, musical iconography, and manuscripts.
Some organologists consider the initial features that distinguished a bassoon from a dulcian to be not so much the sectional construction of the instrument -- examples of jointed dulcians were already to be seen in late 16th-century iconography(8) -- as the extension of the range down to B?
The result was a star-studded gathering of 140 organologists and collectors from three continents.