organology

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organology

 [or″gah-nol´ŏ-je]
the sum of what is known regarding the body organs.

or·ga·nol·o·gy

(ōr'gă-nol'ŏ-jē),
Branch of science concerned with the anatomy, physiology, development, and functions of the various organs.
See also: splanchnology.
[organo- + G. logos, study]

organology

(ôr′gə-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The branch of biology that deals with the structure and function of organs.
2. The branch of musicology that deals with musical instruments and their construction, acoustic properties, classification, history, and broader cultural context.

or′gan·o·log′ic (ôr′gə-nə-lŏj′ĭk, ôr-găn′ə-), or′gan·o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

organology

the sum of what is known regarding the body organs.
References in periodicals archive ?
The key organological reference texts are built on knowledge of surviving instruments and a few specific types of archive, which principally comprise trades directories and parish records.
The Megiddo-style bone pipes are an example of a long organological tradition.
Even though the absolutism of the prince gained the ascendancy, subsequent formulations--such as the corpus mysticum, "the organological concept of `body politic and mystic'" (Kantorowicz 220)--kept alive the view of the realm or the people as a corporation which, enjoying continuity in time, transcended the individual ruler; monarchs, through the mystique of succession, had to identify the monarchy with and substitute it for this corporation (218, 231-32, 297, 338).
Cassirer's answer to this problem rests in his attack on what he calls the organological philosophy of history.
Kulele 1 was an organological monograph and the present volume continues in a related vein.
This is a specialized volume, which presupposes a familiarity with organological issues.
Scholars (from Atbenaeus on) have missed it, I think, because their dedication to the quest for serious organological information in Telestes' words has diverted them from the possibility that there simply is none there.
There can be no doubt that many musicologists, who had not previously done organological research or whose interest in historical performance practice was limited to their own amateur music-making, turned enthusiastically to these areas, no longer feeling that such research was a guilty pleasure.
While the book doesn't betray the scholarly origins found in other of Tyler's works, such as The Early Guitar: A History and Handbook (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1980) and The Guitar and its Music: From the Renaissance to the Classical Era (coauthored with James Tyler [Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002]), this text is a practical guide to the baroque guitar rather than a comprehensive historical and organological study of the instrument.
Since intelligence, maturity, and 'citizenship', are all techno-grammatological constructs and functions of taking care 'of pharmaka through the careful use of pharmaka against the perverse effects of pharmaka' (TC, p35), intelligent, social-political--life requires 'taking care of the social' within the organological conditions (12) forming psychic and collective intelligence, and thus individuation.
Today there are around 2,500 musical instruments in the museum's collections, including all the organological groups, i.
1) The research methods (chapter three) used by Eichmann include detailed metrological investigations, examinations of usage by detecting various fingerprints on the surfaces of the instruments and interpretation of organological details and their function.