organoid


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organoid

 [or´gah-noid]
1. resembling an organ.
2. a structure that resembles an organ.

or·ga·noid

(ōr'gă-noyd),
1. Resembling in superficial appearance or in structure any of the organs or glands of the body.
See also: histoid.
2. Composed of glandular or organic elements and not of a single tissue; pertaining to certain neoplasms (for example, an adenoma) that contain cytologic and histologic elements arranged in a pattern that closely resembles or is virtually identical to a normal organ.
See also: histoid.
3. Synonym(s): organelle
[organo- + G. eidos, resemblance]

organoid

/or·ga·noid/ (or´gah-noid)
1. resembling an organ.
2. a structure that resembles an organ.

organoid

[ôr′gənoid]
Etymology: Gk, organon + eidos, form
1 adj, resembling an organ.
2 n, any structure that resembles an organ in appearance or function, specifically an abnormal tumor mass. See also organelle.

or·ga·noid

(ōr'gă-noyd)
1. Resembling in superficial appearance or in structure any of the organs or glands of the body.
2. Composed of glandular or organic elements, and not of a single tissue; pertaining to certain neoplasms that contain cytologic and histologic elements arranged in a pattern that closely resembles that of a normal organ.
See also: histoid
3. Synonym(s): organelle.
[organo- + G. eidos, resemblance]

or·ga·noid

(ōr'gă-noyd)
1. Resembling in superficial appearance or in structure any of the organs or glands of the body.
2. Composed of glandular or organic elements, and not of a single tissue.
3. Synonym(s): organelle.
[organo- + G. eidos, resemblance]

organoid

1. resembling an organ.
2. a structure that resembles an organ.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our research is more advanced as we are using technology that allows us to grow cancer cells as 3D miniature tumours called organoids.
One important advantage of this method is that the sample remains virtually unaffected during imaging, meaning that the same organoid can be studied multiple times over different days, and crucially both before and after drug treatment.
According to Nelly Cruz, the lead author of the paper, other manipulations to the organoid also affect the progression of polycystic kidney disease.
Long-term adult feline liver organoid cultures for disease modeling of hepatic steatosis.
Isolation of cancer cells and three-dimensional organoid culture
These organoids contain the necessary hallmarks of the human midbrain, which are dopaminergic neurons and neuromelanin.
The HUB's Organoid TechnologyA adds an important new tool to existing research methods, the biotech company said.
Clear cell oncocytomas have the same organoid pattern; the clear cytoplasm was due to the accumulation of glycogen in the oncocytes noted to be PAS positive.
The second stage in the life history of the organoid nevus occurs during adolescence and is characterized by an increase in the thickness of the lesion which may then show smooth surface nodularity or verrucous hyperkeratosis.
He said the organoid was "audacious and the similarities with some of the features of a human brain really quite astounding".
The tissue, dubbed a cerebral organoid, doesn't approach the dizzying complexity of the human brain.