orbita

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or·bit

(ōr'bit), [TA]
The bony cavity containing the eyeball and its adnexa; it is formed of parts of seven bones: the frontal, maxillary, sphenoid, lacrimal, zygomatic, ethmoid, and palatine.
Synonym(s): orbita [TA], eye socket

orbita

/or·bi·ta/ (or´bĭ-tah) pl. or´bitae   [L.] orbit.

or·bit

(ōr'bit) [TA]
The bony cavity containing the eyeball and its adnexa; it is formed of parts of the frontal, maxillary, sphenoid, lacrimal, zygomatic, ethmoid, and palatine bones.
Synonym(s): orbita [TA] , orbital cavity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Orbiter was made for the coffee table, desktop or bar and a 6' tall lawn version was later developed.
Last year's addition of two new spacecraft orbiting Mars brought the census of active Mars orbiters to five, the most ever.
ISRO's Mars Orbiter (@MarsOrbiter) (https://twitter.
com said "To celebrate the Mars Orbiter Success, we thought it imperative to provide a platform for people to share their joy and pride in it.
The spacecraft carry high-gain antennas and higher power transmitters that provide very high-rate, energy-efficient links between orbiters and surface missions as the orbiters pass overhead.
The Mars Orbiter will observe the physical features of Mars and conduct limited study of the Martian atmosphere as finalised by the Advisory Committee on Space Sciences.
After the incident, all 18 Orbiter rides were withdrawn by Health and Safety bosses from funfairs around the country.
A document sent to potential owners states: "Due to the significance of the space shuttle orbiters and the role they have played in the nation's space programme, special attention will be paid to ensuring they will retire to appropriate places.
Desktop Orbiter is expressly designed to facilitate administration and protection of large numbers of workstations.
Circling the planet for at least four years, the orbiter is to provide unparalleled information on weather, climate and geology on Mars, which could aid possible future human exploration of the Red Planet.
The Cardiff team, led by Professor Peter Ade and Dr Darren Hayton, has supplied all of the filters for a telescope on the orbiter.
Planetary scientists are moving closer to an understanding of Martian water thanks to the Mars Orbiter laser altimeter.