oralism


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oralism

(ôr′ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
The theory or practice of teaching hearing-impaired or deaf persons to communicate by means of spoken language.

o′ral·ist adj. & n.

oralism

(or′ăl-ĭzm)
The instruction of hearing-impaired students with speech or speech reading rather than with signed or finger-spelled words.
References in periodicals archive ?
Baynton links the rise of oralism to growing American nationalism in the post-Civil War period, and argues that oralism was adopted by most American schools in the late 19,h century as a means of inculcating a sense of national identity in the deaf.
42) For more on the nineteenth-century history of Oralism, see Davis' Enforcing Normalcy; Douglas C.
This was the helplessness to which proponents of oralism alluded.
This latter point must be understood in terms of one of the forms taken by the debates between oralism and manualism that became more visible near the close of the eighteenth century.
faced in the age of eugenics, oralism, and beyond, see HARLAN LANE, THE
Proposed and imposed in the late nineteenth century by hearing social workers, teachers, and others engaged in deaf education, oralism remained entrenched in America's deaf schools for a century, despite vociferous resistance on the part of the deaf.
Gannon (1981) and Lane (1984) strongly believe that oralism was detrimental to deaf education in this country and that deaf people have been suffering the effects of inadequate education since that time.
Yet, by the 1890s, the move towards oralism was afoot in North America, largely because it was seen as a sign of progress in making the deaf "like" hearing people.
Oralism prevailed in schools for decades until the 1960s, when ASL gained status as a legitimate language.
Attempts to colonize Deaf bodies were combined with attempts to colonize Deaf cultures at the Congress of Milan in 1880, when Oralism officially replaced sign language as the lingua franca of the Deaf.
She discusses how Abbe de l'Epee promoted the education of deaf students, how the movement that celebrated sign language fostered the Societe Centrale, and how hearing educators at the Milan Congress in 1880 adopted oralism to defeat deafness and prohibit sign language.