oral temperature


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oral temperature

Etymology: L, oralis, pertaining to the mouth, temperatura
the body temperature as recorded by a clinical thermometer placed in the mouth. It is normally around 98.6° F (37° C), but it may vary within a fraction of a degree, depending on the individual and such factors as time of day, sleep, and exercise and whether measured before or after a meal. See also normal temperature.
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Placement of thermometer for oral temperature measurement

oral temperature

The temperature obtained by placing a thermometer under the patient's tongue with lips closed for 3 min or by electronic thermometer for the length of time noted on the readout or the manufacturer's direction.

Patient care

It should not be taken for at least 20 min after ingestion of hot or cold liquids. It is not advisable for infants, those who breathe through the mouth, the comatose or obtunded patients, or the critically ill.

See: Temperature: Oral
See also: temperature
References in periodicals archive ?
Vitals were within normal limits and oral temperature measured 36.
We found no significant change in the oral temperature immediately after precooling, and there was no significant between group difference in mid test oral temperature (Table 2).
Symptoms and twice-daily oral temperatures were reported every day by telephone to DOHMH for 21 days; no movement or work restrictions were imposed.
The electronic nondisposable oral temperature device served as the reference thermometer because invasive temperature devices were not used routinely in the study institution.
Her oral temperature curve and laboratory measures had also improved (Figure 4).
The patient's oral temperature was recorded twice a day: his temperature was 37.
1990) monitored oral and axillary temperatures in 100 patients and found that oral temperature was higher in all cases.
evening), and their interaction within each subtest of the coordination and reactive strength tests, as well as oral temperature.
In studying 5 different toothpastes and measuring temperature after toothpaste use, the students found that oral temperature actually increased consistently after using toothpaste.
4[degrees]F to be a fever; in adults, the number 100 is more often used, usually referring to an oral temperature (though in the elderly, normal "resting" temperatures may considerably lower than 98.
On a stable, resting patient, rectal temperature is approximately 2 degrees higher than axillary and 1 degree higher than oral temperature.