oral temperature


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oral temperature

Etymology: L, oralis, pertaining to the mouth, temperatura
the body temperature as recorded by a clinical thermometer placed in the mouth. It is normally around 98.6° F (37° C), but it may vary within a fraction of a degree, depending on the individual and such factors as time of day, sleep, and exercise and whether measured before or after a meal. See also normal temperature.
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Placement of thermometer for oral temperature measurement

oral temperature

The temperature obtained by placing a thermometer under the patient's tongue with lips closed for 3 min or by electronic thermometer for the length of time noted on the readout or the manufacturer's direction.

Patient care

It should not be taken for at least 20 min after ingestion of hot or cold liquids. It is not advisable for infants, those who breathe through the mouth, the comatose or obtunded patients, or the critically ill.

See: Temperature: Oral
See also: temperature
References in periodicals archive ?
On April 16, 2013, we administered a questionnaire to, recorded oral temperatures for, and obtained pharyngeal swab samples from the patient's 60 co-workers (Table 2).
A significant positive correlation was found between oral temperature and flight time of HT (p < 0.
Moreover, as we indicated before, the sample of this study showed a significant diurnal increase in oral temperature (Waterhouse et al.
Oral temperature was higher in the evening than in the morning (p < 0.
Therefore, for ethical reasons, only the oral temperature method was acceptable to the subjects.
Those HCP who had an oral temperature [greater than or equal to]100.
dagger]) Oral temperature [greater than or equal to]100.
Confirmed fever was defined as an oral temperature [greater than or equal to] 100[degrees]F ([greater than or equal to] 37.
Linenger was required to measure his oral temperature and rate his subjective alertness five times per day, recording his results on a laptop computer.
Local medical policy requires hospitalization of advanced training soldiers with ARD symptoms (one or more signs or symptoms of acute respiratory infection and oral temperature of [is greater than or equal to] 38.
CapnoProbe measurements are much like taking an oral temperature, whereas gastric tonometry is a significantly more invasive procedure.