optimistic bias

optimistic bias

(op″tĭ-mis′tik)
The tendency of people beginning a course of treatment to assume that it will succeed even when the outcome is uncertain. Thus investigators tend to assume that their research will yield positive findings.
References in periodicals archive ?
2012) [5] Weinstein and Lyon, Mindset, Optimistic Bias About Personal Risk and Health-Protective Behavior (British Journal of Health Psychology, Nov.
That is an optimistic bias, since it is easy to explain how a deterioration in Britain's trading relationship with the EU will hit the efficiency of supply chains and production, but difficult to see productivity gains from Brexit.
Do moderators of the optimistic bias affect personal or target risk estimates?
We examine the optimistic bias (OB) for an impersonal risk, the first-person perception (FPP) of an impersonal risk, and the influence of media reporting and proximity of an impersonal risk on FPP and OB.
Be aware, for example, that information coming from distributors and wholesalers may be filtered through their overly optimistic bias in judgment.
A pro-innovation bias reflects a dominant optimistic bias in modern society in favor of scientific and technological innovations (Flyvbjerg 2008; Gripenberg, Sveiby, & Segercrantz 2012; Kahneman 2011; Lovallo & Kahneman 2003).
Hobbs was back in the winner's enclosure half an hour later after the conditional riders' handicap hurdle, although this time it was for a share of first place with Sykes and Ciaran Gethings dead-heating with the Jonjo O'Neilltrained Optimistic Bias, who was ridden by Paddy Cowley.
The existence of optimistic bias has spanned administrations.
An example question of an optimistic bias question is: "Compared to other people of my same age and sex (gender), I am less likely than they are to get diabetes.
Direct-to-Consumer Advertising and Consumers' Optimistic Bias About the Further Risk of Depression: The Moderating Role of Advertising Skepticism.
Optimistic bias -- The belief that everything will be alright despite the fact that people take health risks
The planning fallacy is "only one of the manifestations of a pervasive optimistic bias," he writes, which "may well be the most significant of the cognitive biases.