opiate receptors

o·pi·ate re·cep·tors

regions of the brain that have the capacity to bind morphine; some, along the aqueduct of Sylvius and in the center median, are in areas related to pain, but others, as in the striatum, are not related.

o·pi·ate re·cep·tors

(ō'pē-ăt rĕ-sep'tŏrz)
Regions of the brain that have the capacity to bind morphine; some, along the aqueduct of Sylvius and in the centromedian nucleus, are in areas related to pain, but others, as in the striatum, are not related.

o·pi·ate re·cep·tors

(ō'pē-ăt rĕ-sep'tŏrz)
Brain regions with capacity to bind morphine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The program is the only one in the world that concentrates on not stimulating the opiate receptors or even suppressing them naturally through specially designed menus.
Regarding mechanism, it is believed that the somatic (as opposed to the drug craving) symptoms of opiate withdrawal in the adult arise from areas of the brainstem called the locus coeruleus and periaqueductal gray, which express opiate receptors.
The action of these medications includes binding to opiate receptors and changing the perception of and response to painful stimuli while producing central nervous system depression that is generalized (Florence & Palmer, 2003).
Suboxone contains a partial opiate agonist, which attaches to the opiate receptors in the brain, minimizing cravings without causing a high.
He explained that naloxone travels to the brain, where it works to push opiates off of opiate receptors.
Localization of opiate receptors in substantia nigra: evidence by lesion studies.
This thing binds into the opiate receptors in your brain and in most people stimulates appetite, such that we consume 440 more calories per day, 365 days per year.
Mechanisms include central vagal effects likely via the cardioinhibitory parasympathetic vagal neurons in the nucleus ambiguous (1) and the effect on vagal nerve endings and cardiac opiate receptors (2).
I speculate, based on treating hundreds of patients who have been on Suboxone maintenance, that when Suboxone is given long-term it causes abnormal adaptations to opiate receptors and other brain receptors.
Understanding buprenorphine's unique pharmacology requires consideration of opiate receptors and their subtypes.
A dosage of 50 mg/day blocks the euphoria caused by opiate drugs by competitively binding to opiate receptors.