omphalos


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om·pha·los

(om'fă-los),
Rarely used term for umbilicus.
[G. navel]

omphalos

(ŏm′fə-lŏs′, -ləs)
n. pl. ompha·li (-lī)
1. The navel.
2. A central part; a focal point.
3. Any of various stones revered as sacred in ancient Greek civilization, representing the center of the world.
References in periodicals archive ?
Omphalos Venture Partners wishes to work with founders and entrepreneurial management teams who aspire to achieve excellence and is actively seeking investment opportunities in privately held, US based, early stage consumer, healthcare and information technology companies.
s conclusion that all the fine wares, including IRW, Grey, Arikamedu Type 10, Arikamedu Type 18 and Omphalos wares, were the products of a single, pre-existing production centre (Ford et al.
Even the MCG, once the world omphalos of Test cricket, is now little more than one of a set of venues at which sport can be played out for the sake of telly and its advertisers.
The Idylls originated in Tennyson's sense of a sacred omphalos, some ultimate holy place, associated with "the sacred Mount of Camelot" ("earliest fragment," Memoir, 2:122).
These days, of course, the proper political writer is no existentialist, and he dares not locate himself anywhere but the almighty center, that omphalos of triangulated righteousness.
However, to the Greek builders it was mythically situated at the centre of the universe and, since remote times, was marked by an omphalos or navel stone (now lost).
The omphalos of Odysseus and Penelope's well-timbered house, their bed with its one still-rooted olive-trunk post, yet endures.
She begins by discussing the theories comparing the AST with the Jewish asherah and the ancient Egyptian djed-pillar, that is, objects taken to symbolize the omphalos or centre of the world.
50) This is the thread connecting, for example, the practice among pre-Islamic Arabs of covering the graves of ancestors and great men with a dome-shaped leather tent (qobba); Greek conceptions of the omphalos, the cosmic center at Delphi embodied in the form a conoid stone, as the tomb of a legendary king and of Dionysos, and as a home for departed spirits; Roman ideas concerning the mundus, a primitive underground tumulus important to their notions about the afterlife; and Hellenistic and Roman literary descriptions and artistic representations of an arcadian past and future wherein gods and men mingle and a rudimentary construction, of central plan and always pictured with a curved roof, plays a key role.
Heaney, himself, admits that an early engagement with the idea of omphalos greatly influences his poetry.
He posits: "If the Valley resembles a divine omphalos, it also resembles-with its wooded slopes, its single entrance, its penetrable center-a vagina" (317).
Many of the civilizations of the East, and particularly China and Japan, suffered from a particularly powerful form of omphalos syndrome, that is, the natural tendency to consider oneself the center of the world.