omphalocele


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omphalocele

 [om´fah-lo-sēl″]
protrusion, at birth, of part of the intestine through a defect in the abdominal wall at the umbilicus; see also umbilical hernia.
A large omphalocele with structure and contents of the hernial sac. From Betz et al., 1994.

om·phal·o·cele

(om'fal-ō-sēl, om'fă-lō-), [MIM*310980, MIM*164570]
Congenital herniation of viscera into the base of the umbilical cord, with a covering membranous sac of peritoneum-amnion. The umbilical cord is inserted into the sac here, in contradistinction to its attachment in gastroschisis.
See also: umbilical hernia.
[omphalo- + G. kēlē, hernia]

omphalocele

/om·pha·lo·cele/ (om´fah-lo-sēl″) protrusion, at birth, of part of the intestine through a defect in the abdominal wall at the umbilicus.

omphalocele

[om′fəlōsēl′]
Etymology: Gk, omphalos + kele, hernia
congenital herniation of intraabdominal viscera through a defect in the abdominal wall around the umbilicus. The defect is usually closed surgically soon after birth. Compare gastroschisis.
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Omphalocele

omphalocele

A congenital periumbilical defect in which loops of small intestine prolapse into a sac covered by peritoneum and amnion.

Mechanism
Caused by a failure of the intestine at 10 weeks of embryonic development (a time when the gut is normally outside the abdomen) to return to the abdominal cavity.

omphalocele

Neonatology A congenital periumbilical defect in which loops of small intestine prolapse into a sac covered by peritoneum and amnion

om·phal·o·cele

(om-fal'ŏ-sēl)
Congenital herniation of viscera into the base of the umbilical cord, with a covering membranous sac of peritoneum-amnion.
See also: umbilical hernia
Synonym(s): exomphalos (3) , exumbilication (3) .
[omphalo- + G. kēlē, hernia]

omphalocele

Herniation of some of the abdominal contents into the umbilical cord.

Omphalocele

A congenital hernia in which a small portion of the fetal abdominal contents, covered by a membrane sac, protrudes into the base of the umbilical cord.
Mentioned in: Prenatal Surgery

omphalocele

protrusion, at birth, of part of the intestine through a defect in the abdominal wall at the umbilicus.
References in periodicals archive ?
An omphalocele is often described as being giant when the abdominal wall defect size is >5 cm, or when there is more than 50 or 75% of the liver within the sac (Mitanchez et al.
Congenital abdominal wall defects and reconstruction in pediatric surgery: Gastroschisis and omphalocele.
Omphalocele with dextrotardia - A rare association.
Clinical risk factors for gastroschisis and omphalocele in humans: a review of the literature.
The case was diagnosed as an omphalocele and it surgical correction by herniorraphy was undertaken.
In spring 2013, she assisted students in organizing a benefit for a neighborhood young boy afflicted with Omphalocele.
They reported an increase of 5% or more for the following birth defects: anencephaly, spina bifida without anencephaly, encephalocele, Patau syndrome (trisomy 13), Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18), Down syndrome (trisomy 21), omphalocele, gastroschisis, and anophthalmia.
His condition included a "tetralogy of Fallot" (a combination of four cardiac defects which results in deoxygenated blood mixing with oxygenated blood) and an omphalocele, a protrusion of the abdominal contents through the abdominal wall.
The patient may have other associated anomalies9 which include cleft lip and/or palate, abnormal ears, hydrocephalus, cranial/spinal malformations, microphthalmus, congenital heart disease, tracheo-esophageal fistula, omphalocele, anorectal malformation, renal malformation (agenesis, polycystic kidneys), duplication of cervix or uterus, vascular anomalies, nail aplasia or dysplasia, digital anomalies, simian creases, Goltz syndrome (focal dermal hypoplasia), trisomy 13, intestinal lymphangiectasia and pyloric atresia.
Omphalomesenteric duct (OMD) remnants and omphalocele are not infrequently seen in paediatric patients.
In addition fetuses with omphalocele have the abdominal viscera covered with a membranous sac.