omphalitis


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omphalitis

 [om″fah-li´tis]
inflammation of the umbilicus.

om·pha·li·tis

(om'fă-lī'tis),
Inflammation of the umbilicus and surrounding parts.

omphalitis

/om·pha·li·tis/ (om″fah-li´tis) inflammation of the umbilicus.

omphalitis

[om′fəlī′tis]
an inflammation of the umbilical stump marked by redness, swelling, and purulent exudate in severe cases. This condition is rare in developed countries.

omphalitis

(1) Bacterial infection of the stump of the umbilical cord, which usually follows cutting the cord with non-sterile instruments, especially in developing countries in a background of compromised immunity.

Agents
Mixed flora—e.g., E coli, K pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and streptococci.

Clinical findings
Stump inflammation, fever, tachycardia, hypotension, jaundice, without antibiotics, and sepsis.

Mortality
10%

(2) A generic term for inflammation of the umbilical region.

omphalitis

Neonatology Umbilical inflammation

om·pha·li·tis

(om'fă-lī'tis)
Inflammation of the umbilicus and surrounding parts.

omphalitis

Inflammation of the umbilicus.

omphalitis

inflammation, usually by infection, of the tissues of the umbilicus, usually involving the umbilical veins. See also joint-ill.

avian omphalitis
caused by infection of the yolk by Escherichia coli, Proteus spp., bacilli and enterococci and manifested by embryonic and early chick mortality. The yolks are caseous or watery and the chickens edematous. Called also mushy chick disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Compared with infants in the control group, those whose cord had been cleansed were less likely to develop omphalitis, whether they were in the chlorhexidine-alone group (risk ratio, 0.
Because the patients died before antibacterial drug susceptibility testing could be completed, all 5 patients with surgical infections or omphalitis received only empirical therapy with amoxicillin/ clavulanate.
9) Extrapelvic infectious and inflammatory conditions were also noted: extensive skin infections with omphalitis, (10) infected urachal remnant, (11) and hypersensitivity to chromate catgut sutures.
The most characteristic clinical finding is recurrent, severe bacterial infections beginning from birth, such as abscesses of perirectal skin or liver, omphalitis, otitis media, and upper and lower respiratory tract infections, caused by common or uncommon bacterial agents [3,4].
In various case reports and series, the organism has been identified in cases of pneumonia, endocarditis, arthritis, peritonitis, corneal ulcer, and bacteremia, as well as in wound infections among patients with necrotizing fasciitis, tissue allograft infections, neonatal omphalitis, postpartum endometritis, and episiotomy infections.
One hospital study found that in 47% of infants hospitalized with sepsis, cord infections was the source of the illness and that 21% of infants admitted for other reasons had omphalitis, (cord infection) (6).