oligotrophic


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oligotrophic

(ŏl′ĭ-gō-trō′fĭk, -trŏf′ĭk, ō′lĭ-)
adj.
Lacking in plant nutrients and having a large amount of dissolved oxygen throughout. Used of a pond or lake.

ol′i·got′ro·phy (-gŏt′rə-fē) n.

oligotrophic

  1. (of environments, particularly water bodies such as lakes) having a poor nutrient supply and relatively little production of organic material. see EUTROPHIC.
  2. (of plants) associated with low levels of nutrition.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The predominance of inverted biomass pyramids in the plankton of oligotrophic areas would suggest, according to this alternative hypothesis, a greater impact of allochthonous organic subsidies on these communities.
Similar distinctions between oligotrophic blackwater (sediment-poor) and eutrophic alluvial or redwater (sediment-rich) systems occur in many other regions of the world and, in particular, in the southeastern United States (Sharitz & Mitsch, 1993; Walbridge & Lockaby, 1994; Wharton et al.
The oligotrophic condition, P- and light limitation in Peri Lake resulted in heterotrophy (R>NPP) in all sampled months, typical of oligotrophic lakes (Cole et al.
Water level influences on body condition of Geophagus brasiliensis (Perciformes: Cichlidae) in a Brazilian oligotrophic reservoir.
Macrofossils--Characeae oogonia, shells of ostracods and molluscs--found in the lacustrine clay at the bottom of the Pantene/Brauksas I-2006 section, together with pollen of aquatic plants suggest that the clay was deposited in an oligotrophic lake during the late glacial.
Reconstruction of the carbon balance for microsites in a boreal oligotrophic pine fen, Finland.
These habitats include shallow rain-fed seasonal pools and oligotrophic lacustrine habitats.
Native to some waters, kokanee also are stocked into deep oligotrophic waters to create fishing opportunities.
In the oligotrophic Lake Saimaa (Finland), the mean number of dominating species varied between 4 and 8 (Hynynen et al.