olestra


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olestra

(ō-lĕs′trə)
n.
A calorie-free fat substitute synthesized from sucrose and vegetable oil for use in snacks such as potato chips, and capable of passing through the body without being digested.

Olestra

a trade name for a synthetic fat substitute derived from sucrose and eight acids of vegetable oils. Olestra adds no calories or fats to the food into which it is incorporated. Because the molecules of Olestra are larger and more tightly packed than those of ordinary fats, they cannot be broken down by digestive enzymes and cannot enter the bloodstream. Adverse effects reported include cramping and loose stools in some people and inhibition of absorption of some vitamins. A newer formulation is fortified with certain fat-soluble vitamins.

Olestra

A proprietary, FDA-approved synthetic (no-calorie) fat used in savory snack foods—e.g., tortilla chips, potato chips and crackers.  Olestra has an appearance, taste and texture virtually identical to fat, but unlike most dietary fats (which are composed of three fatty acids linked to a glycerol), it is composed of sixt to eight fatty acids linked to glucose and is too large for digestion by the body’s enzymes. Olestra may reduce passive over-consumption as it flows undigested through the GI tract. A one-ounce bag of potato chips fried in olestra has 70 calories; a bag fried in regular fat has 150 calories.

olestra

Sucrose polyester, Olean® A proprietary synthetic–no-calorie fat, approved by the FDA–for use in savory snack foods–eg, tortilla chips, potato chips, and crackers; Side effects GI discomfort including cramps, diarrhea; it binds to vitamins A, D, E, and K, and carotenoids. See Obesity.

o·les·tra

(ō-les'tră)
A fat substitute that is stable for frying, but that also prevents fatty acids and fat-soluble vitamins from being absorbed. Some adverse effects have been reported.

olestra

A non-digestible fat substitute that was given approval by the US Food and Drug Administation (FDA) in 1996 but which does not appear to be the final solution to the obesity problem. About 20 per cent of those eating it are said to have abdominal symptoms such as cramping or diarrhoea. There is also concern that Olestra might inhibit the absorption of fat-soluble antioxidant carotenoids.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pringles, WOW brand potato chips, and a number of other snack foods that are made with olestra can cause abdominal cramping, diarrhea, loose stools, and anal leakage.
The trial demonstrated that olestra - a zero-calorie fat substitute found in low-calorie snack foods such as Pringles - could reduce the levels of serum polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in people who had been exposed to PCBs.
Olestra is a potential boon to public health in the United States, where one person in three is obese and diets are dominated by fat.
Over approximately 2 years of supplemental consumption of foods containing the fat substitute olestra (fatty acid esters of sucrose; approximately 16 g/day in potato crisps), the PCB body burden of the patient's adipose tissue dramatically decreased to 56 mg/kg.
Pesa and Turner (2001) reported that in a national study of 16,262 students in grades 7-12, girls who were practicing weight-control behaviors were found to consume more fruit and vegetables than did girls who were not practicing weight-control behaviors, and Olestra Post-Marketing Surveillance Study (2000) of adolescents aged 7-17 years, found that adolescent girls who tried to control their weight reported a higher intake of vegetables than did adolescent girls who were not trying to control their weight.
219), and congratulates the agency for approving the fat substitute Olestra despite consumer-group protests and for later rescinding a mandatory warning about alleged intestinal cramping and other side effects of this product (p.
On the other hand, Cawley recalled diet soda and Olestra as examples where the food industry has sought ways to increase profit by decreasing the impact of their products on body weight, and the pharmaceutical industry is currently developing drugs to help alleviate obesity, a market that is expected to grow to $1.
1991) reduce the bioavailability of E as do the long-term consumption of Orlistat (a fat absorption inhibitor used for weight loss), and Olestra, a fat substitute (Melia et al.
You wonder when Olestra will be available for other uses, including as a cooking oil for home use.
They watched Procter & Gamble pour hundreds of millions of dollars into olestra, the can't-miss fat substitute.
So the marketing geniuses who we suspect had something to do with adding the intestinally distressing Olestra to potato chips decided to turn our fave foods inside out for fun and profit.
Sullum is certainly welcome to believe olestra is safe if he wishes, despite the science surrounding it.