oil


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oil

 [oil]
1. an unctuous, combustible substance that is liquid, or easily liquefiable, on warming, and is not miscible with water, but is soluble in ether. Such substances, depending on their origin, are classified as animal, mineral, or vegetable oils. Depending on their behavior on heating, they are classified as volatile or fixed. For specific oils, see under the name, as castor oil.
2. a fat that is liquid at room temperature.
essential oil volatile o.
expressed oil (fatty oil) (fixed oil) one that is not volatile, i.e., does not evaporate on warming; such oils consist of a mixture of fatty acids and their esters, and are classified as solid, semisolid, and liquid, or as drying, semidrying, and nondrying as a function of their tendency to solidify on exposure to air.
volatile oil an oil that evaporates readily; such oils occur in aromatic plants, to which they give odor and other characteristics.

oil

(oyl),
An inflammable liquid, of fatty consistency and unctuous feel, which is insoluble in water, soluble or insoluble in alcohol, and freely soluble in ether. Oils are variously classified as animal, vegetable, and mineral according to their source (the mineral oils probably being of remote animal and vegetable origin); into fatty (fixed) and volatile oils; and into drying and nondrying (fatty) oils, the former gradually thickening when exposed to the air and finally drying to a varnish, the latter not drying but liable to become rancid on exposure. Many of the oils, both fixed and volatile, are used in medicine. For individual oils, see the specific names.
[L. oleum; G. elaion, originally olive oil]

oil

(oil)
1. an unctuous, combustible substance that is liquid, or easily liquefiable, on warming, and is soluble in ether but not in water. Oils may be animal, vegetable, or mineral in origin, and volatile or nonvolatile (fixed). A number of oils are used as flavoring or perfuming agents in pharmaceutical preparations.
2. a fat that is liquid at room temperature.

borage oil  that extracted from the seeds of borage; used for the treatment of neurodermatitis and as a food supplement.
cajeput oil  a volatile oil from the fresh leaves and twigs of cajeput; used as a stimulant and rubefacient in rheumatism and other muscle and joint pain.
canola oil  rapeseed oil, specifically that prepared from rapeseed plants bred to be low in erucic acid.
castor oil  a fixed oil obtained from the seed of Ricinus communis; used as a bland topical emollient and also occasionally as a strong cathartic.
clove oil  a volatile oil from cloves; used externally in the treatment of colds and headache and as a dental antiseptic and analgesic; it also has various uses in Indian medicine.
cod liver oil  partially destearinated, fixed oil from fresh livers of Gadus morrhua and other fish of the family Gadidae; used as a source of vitamins A and D.
corn oil  a refined fixed oil obtained from the embryo of Zea mays; used as a solvent and vehicle for various medicinal agents and as a vehicle for injections. It has also been promoted as a source of polyunsaturated fatty acids in special diets.
cottonseed oil  a fixed oil from seeds of cultivated varieties of the cotton plant (Gossypium) ; used as a solvent and vehicle for drugs.
essential oil  volatile o.
ethiodized oil  an iodine addition product of the ethyl ester of fatty acids of poppyseed oil; used as a diagnostic radiopaque medium.
eucalyptus oil  a volatile oil from the fresh leaf of species of Eucalyptus; used as a pharmaceutical flavoring agent, as an expectorant and local antiseptic, for rheumatism, and in folk medicine.
evening primrose oil  that produced from the ripe seeds of evening primrose(Oenothera biennis) ; used in the treatment of mastalgia, premenstrual syndrome, and atopic eczema.
expressed oil , fatty oil, fixed oil a nonvolatile oil, i.e., one that does not evaporate on warming; such oils consist of a mixture of fatty acids and their esters, and are classified as solid, semisolid, and liquid, or as drying, semidrying, and nondrying as a function of their tendency to solidify on exposure to air.
fennel oil  a volatile oil distilled from fennel (the seeds of Foeniculum vulgare ); used for cough, bronchitis, and dyspepsia and as a pharmaceutical flavoring agent.
iodized oil  an iodine addition product of vegetable oil; used as a diagnostic radiopaque medium.
lavender oil  a volatile oil distilled from the flowering tops of lavender or prepared synthetically; used for loss of appetite, dyspepsia, nervousness, and insomnia; also widely used in folk medicine.
mineral oil  a mixture of liquid hydrocarbons from petroleum; used as a lubricant laxative, drug vehicle, and skin emollient and cleanser. Light mineral o., of lesser density, is used similarly.
olive oil  a fixed oil obtained from ripe fruit of Olea europaea; used as a setting retardant for dental cements, topical emollient, pharmaceutic necessity, and sometimes as a laxative.
peanut oil  the refined fixed oil from peanuts (Arachis hypogaea); used as a solvent and vehicle for drugs.
peppermint oil  a volatile oil from fresh overground parts of the flowering plant of peppermint (Mentha piperita); used as a flavoring agent for drugs, and as a gastric stimulant and carminative.
rapeseed oil  the oil expressed from the seeds of the rapeseed plant; used in the manufacture of soaps, margarines, and lubricants. See also canola o.
safflower oil  an oily liquid extracted from the seeds of the safflower, Carthamus tinctorius, containing predominantly linoleic acid; used as a pharmaceutic aid, a component of total parenteral nutrition solutions, and in the management of hypercholesterolemia.
silicone oil  any of various long-chain fluid silicone polymers, some of which are injected into the vitreous to serve as a vitreous substitute during or after vitreoretinal surgery.
tea tree oil  an essential oil from the leaves and branch tips of tea tree, having bacteriostatic and weak antiviral and antimycotic properties, used topically for skin infections and used internally and externally in folk medicine for various indications.
thyme oil  the volatile oil extracted from fresh, flowering thyme; used as an antitussive and expectorant.
volatile oil  one that evaporates readily, usually found in aromatic plants; most are a mixture of two or more terpenes.
volatile oil of mustard  a volatile oil distilled from the seeds of black mustard(Brassica nigra); used as a strong counterirritant and rubefacient.

oil

(oil)
n.
1. Any of numerous mineral, vegetable, or synthetic substances or animal or vegetable fats that are generally slippery, combustible, viscous, liquid or liquefiable at room temperatures, soluble in various organic solvents such as ether but not in water, and used in a great variety of products, especially lubricants and fuels.
2.
a. Petroleum.
b. A petroleum derivative, such as a machine oil or lubricant.
tr.v. oiled, oiling, oils
To lubricate, supply, cover, or polish with oil.

oil

Etymology: L, oleum
any of a large number of greasy liquid substances not miscible in water. Oil may be fixed or volatile and is derived from animal, vegetable, or mineral matter.

oil

(oyl)
An inflammable liquid, of fatty consistency and unctuous feel, which is insoluble in water, soluble or insoluble in alcohol, and freely soluble in ether. Oils are variously classified as animal, vegetable, or mineral, according to their source; into fatty (fixed) and volatile oils; and into drying and nondrying (fatty) oils, the former becoming gradually thicker when exposed to air and finally drying to a varnish, the latter not drying but liable to become rancid on exposure. Many of the oils, both fixed and volatile, are used in medicine. For individual oils, see the specific names.

oil

any fat that is liquid at room temperature.

oil,

n 1. any of a group of organic compounds that are generally combustible, slippery, viscous, and non–water-soluble.
2. a fat that is a liquid at room temperature.
oil, carrier,
n oil used to dilute an essential oil before it is applied on the skin to enhance lubrication for massage techniques and increase absorption by the skin. Popular carrier oils include sweet almond, avocado, evening primrose, jojoba, olive, and wheatgerm. Also called
fixed oil.
oil, chaulmoogra (chä·ōōl·mōō·gr oil),
n Latin names:
Hydnocarpus wightiana, Hydnocarpus anthel-mintica, Taraktogenos kurzii; part used: seeds; uses: leprosy, eczema, psoriasis, scabies, tinea, yeast infections, trichomoniasis; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children; can cause upset stomach, subcutaneous precipitation. Also called
gynocardia oil, hydnocarpus oil, or
krabao's tree seed.
oil, chenopodium (cheˈ·n·pōˑ·dē·m oilˑ),
n Latin name:
Cheno-podium ambrosioides; parts used: seeds, flowering stems; uses: relieve pain, asthma, fungal infections, flatulence, appetite, anthelmintic, digestive disorders, hemorrhoids, wound healing, removal of toxins; precautions: arthritis, gout, kidney stones, hyperacidity; stimulant, can cause dizziness, vomiting, convulsions, and allergic contact dermatitis. Also called
american wormseed, apasote, chenopode, epazote, feuilles a vers, herbe a vers, meksika cayi, paico, pazote, semen contra, simon contegras, welriekende ganzenvoet, wormseed, and
mexican tea.
oil, croton (krōˑ·tn oilˑ),
n Latin name:
Croton tiglium; part used: oil; uses: induce vomiting, relieve constipation, treat rheumatism, gout, neuralgia, bronchitis; precautions: pregnancy, children, abortifacient, can cause drastic watery bowel movements with griping pain, inflam-matory, can produce pustules, tumorigenic. Also called
tiglium seeds and
klotzsch.
oil, essential,
n water-immiscible medicinal substances distilled from plant materials, often used in aromatherapy.
oil, evening primrose,
n Latin name:
Oenothera biennis, Primula elatior; part used: seeds; uses: heart disease, arthritis, PMS, mastalgia, eczema, multiple sclerosis, coughs, bronchitis; precautions: pregnancy, lactation; patients who suffer from seizures; can cause headaches, convulsions, nausea, diarrhea, rashes, aches; and can hamper the immune system. Also called
buckles, butter rose, cowslip, fairy caps, key of heaven, king's-cure-all, mayflower, palsywort, peagles, petty mulleins, and
plumrocks password.
oil, fish,
n the oils and fats from fatty, coldwater fish (e.g., albacore tuna, cod, herring, mackerel, salmon, and sardines) that contains omega-3 essential fatty acids. Has been used to promote cardiovascular health, relieve symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, and menstrual pain, and treat depression. There are no known general precautions for fish oil supplements at low doses, but patients using cod liver oil (particularly pregnant women) should avoid additional supplementation of vitamins A and D to avoid toxicity, and those taking anticoagulants should use caution. See also acid, docosahexaenoic, acid, eicosapentaenoic, and acids, omega-3 fatty.
oil, fixed,
n See oil, carrier.
oil, flaxseed,
n See flax.
oil, floral,
n oil obtained by soaking plant and floral material in vegetable oil, which is then heated gently to release the aromatic compounds from the plant into the oil. Also called
herbal oil, macerated oil, or
infused oil.
oil, folded,
n 1. mixture of different batches of essential oils, thus resulting in concentration of some components and dilution of others.
2. essential oil from which a component has been removed to strengthen more desirable ingredients. Folding may also extend shelf life of essential oils.
oil, herbal,
n a method of medicinal preparation in which chopped herbs are mixed with a vegetable oil base in clear glass and steeped in sunlight for more than two weeks, after which the herbs are strained, and the oil bottled.
oil, infused,
n the end product obtained as a result of the process to extract essential oils via maceration. Also called
herbal oil or
macerated oil.
oil, Lorenzo's,
n Scientific name: C22H42O2 and C17H33COOH; uses: adrenoleukodystophy; precautions: can cause thrombocytopenia.
oil, reconstituted,
n oil synthesized in a laboratory from a variety of sources and aromatic plant materials. Typically inappropriate for aromatherapy. Also called
RCO or
synthetics.
oil, savin (saˑ·vn oilˑ),
n oil extracted from the fresh tops of the shrub
Juniperus sabina, used as a diuretic.
oil, synthetic,
n See oil, reconstituted.
oil, terpeneless essential (terˑ·pēn·ls ·senˑ·shl oilˑ),
n an essential oil that has undergone solvent extraction or vacuum fractionation to remove some or all of the terpenes to increase the longevity of the product or increase the solubility of alcohol. Also called
folded oils.
oil, yinergy (yiˑ·ner·gē oilˑ),
n treatment that contains 25% mag-nesium chloride and raises both dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and intracellular levels of magnesium.
oils, distilled,
n.pl essential oils obtained by distillation; contain only volatile compounds.
oils, expressed,
n.pl essential oils obtained by the process of expression, which contain compounds of all molecular sizes. See also expression.
oils, hazardous,
n.pl oils considered dangerous to use or that require handling with extreme caution. Proper care and use of these oils is outlined in the COSHH and CHIO. See also COSHH and CHIP.
oils, macerated,
n.pl oils prepared by adding plant material to fixed vegetable oils, thus resulting in uptake of oil-soluble molecules of the plant material by the oil. Not to be confused with essential oils.
oils, nature-identical,
n.pl essential oils that comprise components acquired from plant sources but are manufactured from a combination of several essential oils.

oil

(oyl)
An inflammable liquid, of fatty consistency and unctuous feel, which is insoluble in water, soluble or insoluble in alcohol, and freely soluble in ether.

oil,

n an unctuous, combustible substance that is liquid, or easily liquefiable on warming, and soluble in ether but insoluble in water.
oil, essential,
n a volatile, nonfatty liquid of vegetable origin having a distinct aroma and flavor, often pleasant. Also called
volatile oil.
oil, fixed,
n a nonvolatile oil consisting mainly of glycerides.
oil, mineral,
n a grade of liquid petrolatum.
oil, volatile,
n See oil, essential.

oil

1. an unctuous, combustible substance that is liquid, or easily liquefiable, on warming, and is not miscible with water, but is soluble in ether. Such substances, depending on their origin, are classified as animal, mineral or vegetable oils.
2. a fat that is liquid at room temperature.

automobile oil
oil of chenopodium
extracted from the plant Chenopodium ambrosioides. An old-time anthelmintic.
oil-contamination
the coating of spilled crude oil on waterbirds that destroys the waterproofing and insulating properties of their feathers, predisposing them to hypothermia and impairing flight and swimming abilities. It also blocks nares, causes aspiration pneumonia, and has toxic effects on kidneys, reproduction and the gastrointestinal tract.
oil crop
crops grown primarily for their oil production, e.g. linseed, safflower, sunflower, rapeseed.
crude petroleum oil
crude oil and its several distillates are all relished by cattle and can cause poisoning. The oil as it is extracted from subterranean deposits varies widely in its additional contents. These may be salt or sulfur and cause poisoning by those substances. Oil causes vomiting and death from aspiration pneumonia. Animals do not do well and oil stays in the gut, appearing in the feces for long periods.
diesel and fuel oil
essential oil
called also ethereal oil; see volatile oil (below).
ethereal oil
see volatile oil (below).
fixed oil
an oil that does not evaporate on warming and occurs as a solid, semisolid or liquid.
oil gland
irritant oil
occurs in plants; causes gastroenteritis; includes bryonin, croton and castor oils.
mineral oil
a mixture of liquid hydrocarbons from petroleum. Mineral oil is available in both light (light liquid petrolatum) and heavy (liquid, or heavy liquid, petrolatum) grades. Light mineral oil is used chiefly as a vehicle for drugs, though it may also be used as a cathartic and to cleanse the skin. Heavy mineral oil is used as a cathartic, solvent and oleaginous vehicle. Excessive intake over a long period results in hypovitaminosis A.
oil pollution
aquatic birds are worst affected because of pasting together of feathers, poisoning because of contamination of food source, blocking of nares and eyes and starvation because of unpalatability of food supply.
oil products
includes kerosene (or kerosine, or paraffin), gasoline (or petrol), diesoline and additives to lubricating oils, e.g. highly chlorinated naphthalenes; any of them may cause poisoning.
oil spill
accidental or negligent discharge of industrial oil on a body of water; effect is that the oil floats and pollutes the shore and covers aquatic birds and mammals with fatal results in most cases; salvage depends on capture of affected birds and animals and removing the oil.
sump oil
sweet birch oil
see methyl salicylate.
turpentine oil
see turpentine oil.
volatile oil
an oil that evaporates readily; such oils occur in aromatic plants, to which they give odor and other characteristics.
oil of Wintergreen
see methyl salicylate.
yew oil
an irritant oil in Taxus baccata, but not the principal irritant in that plant—taxine is.

Patient discussion about oil

Q. Does fish-oil helps exercise induced asthma? I was diagnosed with exercise induced asthma a couple of year ago, and since then had better and worse times with my asthma, although the treatment I get. I read in a newspaper that fish oil can help exercise induced asthma- is that true? Do I have to eat fish-oil specifically or can I eat fish instead (I really, really, hate fish-oil…)?

A. I take 6, 1000mg softgels/day. It helps my asthma, arthritis and has lowered my closterol. Started with 10 and worked down to 6, which seems to work best, though sometimes I need the extra.

Q. if someone is allergic to olive trees, does that mean they are allergic to olive oil as well?

A. I asked him, and he said he has no prob with olive oil.
Dinner was spectacular if i may add :)

Q. I am wondering if any of you are ENTHUSED about the use of COCONUT OIL. I ask because it IS SATURATED FAT. I have trouble losing weight. That inculdes getting cold frequently, and was wondering if cocounut oil would help me maintain body temperture more easily. Also, I have notice that SOME claim that coconut oil has many health benefits not affiliated with polyunsaturates.

A. i know there was a Polynesian research about people that consume coconut oil on a daily basis in parallel to people who don't. they found out that there are high cholesterol levels among the people that consumed coconut oil but no significant difference in heart problems.

More discussions about oil
References in periodicals archive ?
The report provides in-depth analysis and insights into companies' capital spending, revenues, oil and gas reserves, production, and performance measures.
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The industry developed in the Valley in the 1800s and at its peak in the first half of the 20th century, Sylmar had about 2,000 acres of olive trees and produced about 50,000 gallons of olive oil a year.
Venezuela, Chavez told me, has more oil than Saudi Arabia.
It also displaced Japan to become the world's second largest oil consumer.
He added, "The inability readily to expand the supply of oil, given rising demand, will in the future impose a severe economic shock.
Krassimir Petrov of the American University in Bulgaria, will be a petroleum commodity market "based on a euro-oil-trading mechanism that naturally implies payment for oil in euro," rather than in dollars.
Does it mean I'm running the oil too hot if I am getting carbon on the Y-strainer?
Once life was like this for oil workers in Texas, where roadside oil wells were symbols of a new American prosperity.