off

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off

term used when talking of a horse's age, e.g. '6 off' for a horse which has just passed 6 years, as opposed to 'rising 7' for approaching 7 years.

Patient discussion about off

Q. why are my toenails falling off? A few months ago my big toenail fell off. Now my nails on my baby toes are falling off. My doctor sent a sample of my toenail to a lab but said it came back clean with no signs of fungi. What else could explain nail loss when there has been no trauma or injury either?

A. That is indeed a very strange phenomenon. You should either way get treated for nail fungi, because there is still a chance there's an infection that was not seen in the specimen sent. Also diabetes or PVD (peripheral vascular disease, in which there is poor blood supply to the small vessels in the legs and feet) can cause your toenails to not get enough blood supply and fall off.

Q. Will my hair fall off if I have leukemia? I was diagnosed with ALL and I have to pass on a series of chemotherapy treatments, will my hair fall off? What are the side effects of chemotherapy?

A. Sorry but Yes. Most chemotherapy drugs that will be used do have the side effect of hair loss. However, this will only be temporary and your hair will grow back, probably even better than before! This is just a minor setback, not to be concerned about it..

Q. How do I explain why I keep going off my meds? Am I the only one that has this problem?

A. No problem it is actually a really good book for both someone with bipolar as well as family members. For someone with bipolar it is a lot that you can relate to and for family it gives an inside look at what the illness is like from a first hand position. It helped me understand more of what my partner was going through and what this illness is like from her perspective. It covers a lot of things that I found my partner had a hard time talking about and expressing...

More discussions about off
References in classic literature ?
it was dreadful; but it was not only the pain, though that was terrible and lasted a long time; it was not only the indignity of having my best ornament taken from me, though that was bad; but it was this, how could I ever brush the flies off my sides and my hind legs any more?
Tip it off to him that there's diamonds on the red-hot ramparts of hell, and Mr.
Another Rule of Battle, that Alice had not noticed, seemed to be that they always fell on their heads, and the battle ended with their both falling off in this way, side by side: when they got up again, they shook hands, and then the Red Knight mounted and galloped off.
The source of this contradiction lies in the fact that the historians studying the events from the letters of the sovereigns and the generals, from memoirs, reports, projects, and so forth, have attributed to this last period of the war of 1812 an aim that never existed, namely that of cutting off and capturing Napoleon with his marshals and his army.
Hans was delighted as he sat on the horse, drew himself up, squared his elbows, turned out his toes, cracked his whip, and rode merrily off, one minute whistling a merry tune, and another singing,
At last, a gossip of Mrs Nubbles's, who had accompanied her to chapel on one or two occasions when a comfortable cup of tea had preceded her devotions, furnished the needful information, which Kit had no sooner obtained than he started off again.
Tom was carried off by the chambermaid in a brown study, from which he was roused in a clean little attic, by that buxom person calling him a little darling and kissing him as she left the room; which indignity he was too much surprised to resent.
It was kind of lazy and jolly, laying off comfortable all day, smoking and fishing, and no books nor study.
One day, however, as he was lying half asleep in the warm water somewhere off the Island of Juan Fernandez, he felt faint and lazy all over, just as human people do when the spring is in their legs, and he remembered the good firm beaches of Novastoshnah seven thousand miles away, the games his companions played, the smell of the seaweed, the seal roar, and the fighting.
At the earliest streak of day one of the leaders would mount his horse, and gallop off full speed for about half a mile; then look round for Indian trails, to ascertain whether there had been any lurkers round the camp; returning slowly, he would reconnoitre every ravine and thicket where there might be an ambush.
So you maintain that Christine Daae was carried off by an angel: an angel of the Opera, no doubt?
The three soldiers wandered about for a minute or two, looking for them, and then quietly marched off after the others.