ODD

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ODD

Abbreviation for oculodentodigital dysplasia (syndrome).

ODD

Abbreviation for:
oxygen-dependent degradation

ODD

Abbreviation for oculodentodigital dysplasia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The oddness of Ezekiel and his stories sometimes gives us the cover of competing poetic interpretations.
Crawford carefully balances the intensity and oddness of their private lives with a good portion of humor.
Throughout this courageous work, Hoffman investigates the oddness of the processes, technological and otherwise, that we invent in order to remember.
However neat or decorous the storytelling, the movie respects the oddness of Vincent's refusal; which is to say, it reveals something of the oddness of the normal world by letting Vincent haunt it from a slight remove.
Every now and then, though, a race crops up that throws the oddness of this situation into relief.
The dusty, rather dowdy country of cacti and kibbutzes presented to visitors through the official publications of the tourism ministry leaves no clue as to the vibrancy, the oddness, the intensity of the place.
She will misinterpret his sensitivity as softness, his spirituality as oddness, his money as his cure-all, his romanticism as an attempt to hide something.
Commenting on the large amount of "image of" studies on African Americans, women, and other "marginalized" groups, Richard Dyer has noted that such studies have the "effect of reproducing the sense of oddness, differentness, exceptionality of these groups" while whiteness continues as the norm ("White" 141).
But this oddness is only the reverse, witty side of the perception in the Holocaust poems of something radically uncanny about man - abysmally so when he puts on boots and marches people into boxcars, astonishingly so when as victim he manages, despite everything, to survive.
in which dative vagis refers to the subject of tenebant, but hardly the oddness of the idea that primitive people `held' or `inhabited' places which were known to them as they wandered about.
But what remains unclear is whether they value the family in spite of their oddness or because of their oddness.
But of course those who think the oddness is more than unfamiliarity will find the passages he quotes no less odd than the original assertion.